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The Integrated Prom: A Mississippi Editor Responds

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The Integrated Prom: A Mississippi Editor Responds

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The Integrated Prom: A Mississippi Editor Responds

Mississippi's Charleston High School held its first interracial prom in April. Catherine Farquharson hide caption

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The Integrated Prom: A Mississippi Editor Responds

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Jackson Free Press editor Donna Ladd talks about you.

This year, for the first time, the high school in Charleston, Miss., held an integrated prom — ending a system of parallel parties for black and white students. After we covered the story this week, a whole lot of people wrote in to say they were just plain shocked that any kind of segregation could still exist in this country.

Um, private golf courses, anyone? Suburban high schools — and inner city ones? Your church?

Since I first learned about the integrated prom through a report in the Jackson Free Press, I called the editor for her reaction. Donna Ladd is a longtime friend and hero of mine. More than once, she and her staff have tracked down a suspect in a decades-old race murder. She runs an integrated paper with an integrated audience. In my book, Donna Ladd has earned the right to talk about this, and what she says is that we need to see what's happening right in our neighborhoods.

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