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Listener Checks In: What It Means To Be Russian

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Listener Checks In: What It Means To Be Russian

Book Club

Listener Checks In: What It Means To Be Russian

Muscovites wait for bread, December 1993. Michael Evstafiev/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Listener Checks In: What It Means To Be Russian

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Nina Charnotskaia on the lasting effects of hardship in Russia.

BPP listener Nina Charnotskaia came to the United States from the collapsing Soviet Union when she was 11 years old. So our latest BPP Book Club selection, Anya Ulinich's Petropolis — which tells the story of Russian immigrant Sasha Goldberg — really resonated with her. Charnotskaia, who lives in San Diego, told us that because she started speaking with an American accent soon after she moved here, people have often challenged her "Russianness." But she's never lost her sense that being Russian is an important part of her identity. She talked with us about what that means to her.

We'll be discussing the book here on the blog on July 9, a week from today. So get reading, if you haven't already!

Bonus: Sign up for BPP Book Club alerts.

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