A startup called Opternative offers online vision tests using a computer and a smartphone. Coutesy of Opternative hide caption

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Online Eye Exam Site Makes Waves In Eye Care Industry
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Verizon, Quicken Loans And Others Bid On Yahoo's Core Internet Business
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CEO Uses Company's Clout To Get Involved In Controversial State Measures
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Televisions display a political ad from 2011 in Iowa. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Do TV Attack Ads Work Anymore?
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Budget Shortfalls Affect National Parks' Maintenance, Cleaning
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Warehouse employee Rejinaldo Rosales, 34, at work in Tracy, Calif. Brandon Bailey/AP hide caption

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Millions To Be Eligible For Overtime Under New Obama Administration Rule
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When It Comes To Economic Election Prediction Models, It's A Mixed Bag
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"Some days I wake up and go, 'Am I wasting time, when I could be on chemotherapy or getting a surgery?' " asks Tony Lapinski, a Montana veteran who worries about what is causing his severe back pain. Michael Albans for NPR hide caption

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Despite $10B 'Fix,' Veterans Are Waiting Even Longer To See Doctors
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A Wes Wilson poster promoting the 13th Floor Elevators, Great Society, Sopwith Camel at the Fillmore Auditorium on August 26 and 27, 1966. Wes Wilson hide caption

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Psychedelic Font: How Wes Wilson Turned Hippie Era Turmoil Into Art
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Michigan Bank Discovers The Need For Islamic Finance Products
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The head of the Panama Canal Authority, Jorge Quijano, center, opens the main valve to allow water into the flood chambers on the new set of locks on the Atlantic side of the Panama Canal in June 2015. The expansion of the canal, making it wider and deeper to accommodate larger ships, has taken nearly a decade. It opens next month. Tito Herrera/AP hide caption

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A Wider, Deeper Panama Canal Prepares To Open Its Locks
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New Technology Could Revive Pacific Northwest's Ailing Timber Industry
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Are More U.S. Workers Beginning To Get Raises?
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Marvie, the host of Sesame Studios, will sing and answer viewer questions. Sesame Workshop hide caption

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Beyond 'Sesame Street': A New Sesame Studios Channel On YouTube
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Jennifer Kaiser, a 44-year-old legal assistant from Indianapolis, says her yearly raises are eaten up by expenses. Jim Zarroli/NPR hide caption

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Politics In Real Life: What Wage Stagnation Looks Like For Many Americans
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Actor Vin Diesel drives a vintage American car next to actress Michelle Rodriguez while shooting the latest installment of the Fast and Furious movie franchise in Havana, Cuba on April 28. Fast and Furious 8 is the second U.S. movie, and the first big-budget Hollywood film, to be shot in Havana since relations began improving between the two countries. Fernando Medina/AP hide caption

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Hollywood Rediscovers Cuba: Is It Too Soon To Call It Havanawood?
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Jesse Vega checks out a vehicle at an Uber "Work On Demand" recruitment event March 10 in South Los Angeles. The company is researching ways to get rid of its surge pricing, a feature that drivers like but that can make costs unpredictable for consumers. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Uber Plans To Kill Surge Pricing, Though Drivers Say It Makes Job Worth It
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If There's A Surplus Of Cheap Crude, Why Do Oil Wells Keep Pumping?
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Investors in Zhongjin, a wealth-management company that collapsed this month, demonstrate outside a police office in Shanghai's Hongkou district, demanding repayment of their funds. Police later detained one of the demonstrators for distributing protest T-shirts. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Chinese Investors Reeling After Wealth Management Firm's Collapse
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Dick and Dolly Miller play the slots at the Cal-Nev-Ari Casino. They say the thought of Nancy Kidwell stepping down makes folks nervous here. Danny Hajek/NPR hide caption

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A Tiny Nevada Town Hits The Market For $8 Million — Casino Included
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One Silicon Valley startup that encouraged its employees to think about work 24/7 found they missed market signals, tanked deals and became too irritable to build crucial working relationships. Hill Street Studios/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Many Grouchy, Error-Prone Workers Just Need More Sleep
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(The Latest) Corruption Charges In Detroit's Struggling Schools
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Do Felons Make Good Employees?
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Treasury To Give $20 Bill A New Look
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Too Much Empty Space In Pepper Tin Prompts Class-Action Lawsuit
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