The National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine recommends that most adults get about 600 international units of vitamin D per day through food or supplements, increasing that dose to 800 IUs per day for those 70 or older. essgee51/Flickr hide caption

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A Bit More Vitamin D Might Help Prevent Colds And Flu

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A child with nodding syndrome waits for treatment at an outreach site in Uganda's Pader district. Matthew Kielty for NPR hide caption

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Matthew Kielty for NPR

Scientists May Have Solved The Mystery Of Nodding Syndrome

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Editing human genes that would be passed on for generations could make sense if the diseases are serious and the right safeguards are in places, a scientific panel says. Claude Edelmann/Science Source hide caption

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Claude Edelmann/Science Source

Scientific Panel Says Editing Heritable Human Genes Could Be OK In The Future

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Nicole Xu for NPR

Depression Strikes Today's Teen Girls Especially Hard

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About a quarter of people between the ages of 20 and 69 have some hearing loss, typically from everyday noises like lawn mowers and music. vitranc/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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vitranc/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Think Your Hearing's Great? You Might Want To Check It Out

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Pope Benedict XVI apologized in 2008 to victims of child sex abuse by Roman Catholic clergy at a mass in Sydney at St. Mary's Cathedral. Rick Rycroft/AP hide caption

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Rick Rycroft/AP

Heat and steam from your shower or shave can rob medicine of its potency long before the drug's expiration date. Angela Cappetta/Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Cappetta/Getty Images

When Old Medicine Goes Bad

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A newborn has its umbilical cord cut after birth in a Nigerian hospital. In a contest last week, MBA students came up with plans to get moms and dads to use an antiseptic on the cord stump to ward off infection. Courtesy of Karen Kasmauski/USAID's flagship Maternal and Child Survival Program hide caption

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Courtesy of Karen Kasmauski/USAID's flagship Maternal and Child Survival Program
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Which Genes Make You Taller? A Whole Bunch Of Them, It Turns Out

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A color-enhanced spiral CT image of the chest shows a large cancerous mass (in yellow) in the left upper lobe. Medical Body Scans/Science Source hide caption

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Medical Body Scans/Science Source

Lung Cancer Screening Program Finds A Lot That's Not Cancer

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Researchers are trying to tease apart the reasons why girls are less likely to become scientists and engineers. Marc Romanelli/Getty Images/Blend Images hide caption

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Marc Romanelli/Getty Images/Blend Images

Vanessa Ramirez was diagnosed with ovarian cancer when she was in college. Today she and her kids get their health care through the Affordable Care Act. But child advocates say a repeal of that law could jeopardize the program that covers her children. Will Stone/KJZZ hide caption

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Will Stone/KJZZ

Arizona Children Could Lose Health Coverage Under Obamacare Repeal

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Giving dads a task — in this case, reading — seemed to suit them better than the kind of parenting classes favored by moms. Maskot/Getty Images hide caption

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Salma Shabaik holds her newborn son, Ali. When he was born, she held him naked against her bare skin, a practice called kangaroo care. Ali is wearing an ear cap to correct a lop ear. Morgan Walker for NPR hide caption

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Morgan Walker for NPR

Kangaroo Care Helps Preemies And Full Term Babies, Too

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Concerns about mercury contamination have led many pregnant women to under-consume seafood. So the FDA issued a new chart explaining what to eat and what to avoid. But critics say it muddles matters. stock_colors/Getty Images hide caption

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The American Academy of Pediatrics' guidelines on when children should stay home are more liberal than those of many day care centers. Thanasis Zovoilis/Getty Images hide caption

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Thanasis Zovoilis/Getty Images

The highly rated variety of medical marijuana known as "Blue Dream" was displayed among other strains at a cannabis farmers market in Los Angeles in 2014. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

Marijuana's Health Effects? Top Scientists Weigh In

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