Vials of the HPV vaccination drug Gardasil. Doctors and public health experts say the new version of the vaccine could protect more people against cancer. Matthew Busch for The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Matthew Busch for The Washington Post/Getty Images

State and federal policies now limit the use of lead in gasoline, paint and plumbing, but children can still ingest the metal through contaminated soil. The effects of even fairly small amounts can be long-lasting, the evidence suggests. Christin Lola/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Christin Lola/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Childhood Exposure To Lead Can Blunt IQ For Decades, Study Suggests

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Kathleen helps her son Gideon get his glasses on. Part of Gideon's brain was damaged during development, which effects his vision. Caitlin O'Hara for NPR hide caption

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Caitlin O'Hara for NPR

For Gideon, Infection With a Common Virus Caused Rare Birth Defects

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There's overwhelming consensus that breast-feeding is the optimal way to feed an infant. But the topic of how breast-feeding may influence cognitive ability is controversial. Guerilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Breast-Fed Kids May Be Less Hyper, But Not Necessarily Smarter, Study Finds

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Twins Ryan and Nell Stimpert lie in their baby boxes at home in Cleveland. The cardboard boxes are safe and portable places for the babies to sleep. Maddie McGarvey for NPR hide caption

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Maddie McGarvey for NPR

A new study shows that when infants and young children grow up in households without enough to eat, they are more likely to perform poorly at school years later. Daniel Fishel for NPR hide caption

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Daniel Fishel for NPR

Women worry that bad things will happen if they exercise while pregnant, but doctors say in almost all cases it's not just safe, but can improve health. Alija/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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A pair of studies show declines in opioid use by young people, including prescription use, intentional misuse and accidental poisonings. Gabe Souza/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images hide caption

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Julia (center) first appeared online and in printed materials as a part of Sesame Street's See Amazing in all Children initiative. She'll now appear on TV as well. From left, Elmo, Alan Muraoka, Julia, Abby Cadabby and Big Bird. Zach Hyman/Sesame Workshop hide caption

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Zach Hyman/Sesame Workshop

Julia, A Muppet With Autism, Joins The Cast Of 'Sesame Street'

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Cecile Richards, the president of Planned Parenthood, says the health care provider takes in about $400 million per year in reimbursements under Medicaid and other federal programs. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Planned Parenthood Would Lose Millions In Payments Under GOP Health Plan

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Getting kids to eat veggies through subterfuge — say, by sneaking spinach into smoothies -- sets the bar too low, researchers say. Your child must actually learn to like veggies, weird textures and all. Alex Reynolds/NPR hide caption

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Alex Reynolds/NPR

A gestational surrogate is a woman who carries a fetus but is not genetically related to it, in order to help other people become parents. Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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A human embryo kept alive in the lab for 12 days begins to show signs of early development. The green cells seen here in the center would go on to form the body. This embryo is in the process of twinning, forming two small spheres out of one. Courtesy of Gist Croft, Cecilia Pellegrini, Ali Brivanlou/Rockefeller University hide caption

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Courtesy of Gist Croft, Cecilia Pellegrini, Ali Brivanlou/Rockefeller University

Embryo Experiments Reveal Earliest Human Development, But Stir Ethical Debate

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Advocates of paying a family doctor a flat monthly fee for office visits and some lab work say it saves patients money when coupled with a high-deductible insurance plan. Ridofranz/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Dr. Joel Funari performs some 300 tooth extractions annually at his private practice in Devon, Pa.. He's part of a group of dentists reassessing opioid prescribing guidelines in the state. Elana Gordon / WHYY hide caption

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Elana Gordon / WHYY

Dentists Work To Ease Patients' Pain With Fewer Opioids

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