An illustration of a fetal lamb inside the "artificial womb" device, which mimics the conditions inside a pregnant animal. The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia hide caption

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The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Scientists Create Artificial Womb That Could Help Prematurely Born Babies

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Roughly 2 million of the kids covered by the Children's Health Insurance Program have a chronic health condition, such as asthma. LSOphoto/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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LSOphoto/Getty Images/iStockphoto

In two recent clinical trials of Harvoni and Sovaldi in the treatment of young people between the ages of 12 and 17, the drugs eliminated all traces of the hepatitis C virus in 97 to 100 percent of patients, generally in 12 weeks. Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images

At Saint Michael's Association for Special Education in St. Michaels, Ariz., the tap water sometimes runs yellow, brown and black. Sami Rapp/Courtesy of Saint Michael's Association for Special Education hide caption

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Sami Rapp/Courtesy of Saint Michael's Association for Special Education

On The Navajo Nation, Special Ed Students Await Water That Doesn't Stink

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Though they failed to mobilize Congress to repeal the Affordable Care Act last month, Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) (right), Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) and the White House could still undercut the insurance exchanges, reduce Medicaid benefits and let states limit coverage of birth control or prenatal visits. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Mitochondrial diseases can be passed from mothers to their children in DNA. JGI/Tom Grill/Getty Images/Blend Images hide caption

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JGI/Tom Grill/Getty Images/Blend Images

Social media postings showing parents "disciplining" their children, including (from left) LaToya Graham, ReShonda Tate Billingsley and Tavis Sellers, went viral. ABC 2 News WMAR; ReShonda Tate Billingsley; Tavis Sellers/Screenshots by NPR hide caption

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ABC 2 News WMAR; ReShonda Tate Billingsley; Tavis Sellers/Screenshots by NPR

A Syrian child is treated at a hospital in the town of Maaret al-Noman after a suspected chemical attack on April 4. Mohamed Al-Bakour /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohamed Al-Bakour /AFP/Getty Images

A girl carries a child in the outskirts of Lilongwe, the capital of Malawi. That's one of the countries in sub-Saharan Africa that has made good progress in reducing child mortality. Aris Messinis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Aris Messinis/AFP/Getty Images

A well-regarded intensive care doctor in Virginia says he has had good success in treating 150 sepsis patients with a mix of IV corticosteroids, vitamin C and vitamin B, along with careful management of fluids. Other doctors want more proof — the sort that comes only via more rigorous tests. Sukiyashi/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Sukiyashi/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Why The Newly Proposed Sepsis Treatment Needs More Study

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A family member holds twins Eloisa (left) and Eloa, both 8 months old and born with microcephaly, during a Christmas gathering. The mother of the twins, Raquel, who lives in Brazil, said she contracted Zika during her pregnancy. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images