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Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., continues to tweak the health care bill he cosponsors in an effort to persuade reluctant senators to back it. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists calls the flu vaccine an "essential" part of prenatal care, for protection of the newborn as well as the woman. Infants typically don't get their own flu shot until age 6 months or later. Katherine Streeter for NPR hide caption

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Pregnant Women Should Still Get The Flu Vaccine, Doctors Advise

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Food allergies are tricky to diagnose, and many kids can outgrow them, too. A test called an oral food challenge is the gold standard to rule out an allergy. It's performed under medical supervision. Michelle Kondrich for NPR hide caption

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Michelle Kondrich for NPR

This Test Can Determine Whether You've Outgrown A Food Allergy

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Two-year-old Robbie Klein of West Roxbury, Mass., has hemophilia, a medical condition that interferes with his blood's ability to clot normally. His parents, both teachers, worry that his condition could make it hard for them to get insurance to cover his expensive medications if the law changes. Jesse Costa/Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/Jesse Costa/WBUR

Protesters rally against Medicaid cuts in front of the U.S. Capitol in June. Medicaid is the nation's largest health insurance program, covering 74 million people — more than 1 in 5 Americans. Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/Getty Images

Sen. Lindsey Graham, second from left, speaks as Sen. John Barrasso, from left, Sen. Bill Cassidy, Sen. John Thune and Senate Majority Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell listen during a news briefing Tuesday. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Affordable Care Act navigators helped guide those looking for insurance during an enrollment event at San Antonio's Southwest General Hospital last year. Beyond helping with initial enrollment, navigators often follow up with help later, as an applicant's income or job status changes. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Brian Keith Thompson, owner of the Body Electric tattoo and piercing studio in Hollywood, says he is relentless in enforcing hygiene standards. Courtesy of Body Electric Tattoo hide caption

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Courtesy of Body Electric Tattoo

Teen Wants A Tattoo? Pediatricians Say Here's How To Do It Safely

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While benzodiazepines and SSRI antidepressants are not risk-free, says Yale psychiatrist Kimberly Yonkers, "it should be reassuring that we're not seeing a huge magnitude of an effect here" on pregnancy. Hanna Barczyk for NPR hide caption

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Hanna Barczyk for NPR

Xanax Or Zoloft For Moms-To-Be: A New Study Assesses Safety

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FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb says the agency will close a loophole that lets drug manufacturers skip pediatric testing in some drugs intended for children. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Researchers set out to answer this question: Is there a safe level of alcohol consumption during pregnancy? Turns out, that's a hard question to answer. The advice remains: Don't risk it. Tim Clayton/Corbis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Clayton/Corbis/Getty Images

Is One Drink OK For Pregnant Women? Around The Globe, The Answer Is No

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