Parents can minimize the negative impact of their arguments on their children using a few simple techniques to calm down. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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How To Turn Down The Heat On Fiery Family Arguments

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Is American Day Care ... Hell?

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The Doctor Trying To Solve The Mystery Of Food Allergies

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How much oxygen should severely premature infants receive? A study that sought to answer the question has been criticized for not fully informing parents about the risks to their children. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Helping Teens Cope With A Parent's Cancer

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Researchers say that aggressive people tend to interpret ambiguous faces as reflecting hostility. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Would Angry Teens Chill Out If They Saw More Happy Faces?

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Industrial cities like Detroit have high levels of lead in the aging housing stock and in soils. Researchers found that the amount of soil lead in Detroit that gets suspended in the air correlated with the levels of lead in kids' blood. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Plan B is one of two emergency contraceptives available in the U.S. UPI/Landov hide caption

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Students select blueberries and rolls from the food line at Lincoln Elementary in Olympia, Wash., in 2004. John Froschauer/AP hide caption

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Frequent spitting up affects about half of babies under six months, but it's usually not gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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A new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds no link between the number of vaccinations a young child receives and the risk of developing autism spectrum disorders. Jeff J. Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Number Of Early Childhood Vaccines Not Linked To Autism

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