New Haven Public Schools' summer food truck will deliver an expected 40,000 free meals to kids in eligible neighborhoods during July and August. Timothy Cipriano/New Haven Public Schools hide caption

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Kimberly Payton, a teacher at the Small Savers Child Development Center, reads to a group of preschoolers in Washington, D.C., in 2010. Researchers say that teachers who make small changes in how they read to 4-year-olds can improve kids' reading skills later on. Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Small Change In Reading To Preschoolers Can Help Disadvantaged Kids Catch Up

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Fathers 'Need To Step Up' For Black Daughters

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Military Children Act Out: Performing 'Deployment'

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A label on a package of Tide laundry detergent packets warns parents to keep them away from children. Nearly 250 cases of illness from such packets have been reported to poison control centers this year. Pat Sullivan/AP hide caption

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Katie Beckett fits herself with a vibrating vest that helps clear mucous from her lungs. A nurse comes over to her apartment in Cedar Rapids to help her do this twice a day. On the wall to the right are pictures of Katie as a child with Ronald Reagan. This story starts twenty-nine years ago with an angry President Ronald Reagan. <> We just recently received word of a little girl who has spent most of her life in a hospital. <> The little girl in the hospital was three-year-old Katie Beckett. Because of a brain infection, she needed to be hooked to a ventilator at night to breathe. Her parents wanted her home. Her doctors said she'd be better off at home. And it'd be cheaper, too: Just one-sixth the cost. John Poole/NPR hide caption

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Karlton Hill, 15, was diagnosed with diabetes when he was 12. He works hard to manage the disease: He jogs and does pushups every day; he takes metformin is very careful about what he eats. Leslie Capo/LSU Health Sciences Center hide caption

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A Dire Sign Of The Obesity Epidemic: Teen Diabetes Soaring, Study Finds

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Alivia Parker, 21 months at the time, ran through circles of spraying water on a hot day in Montgomery, Ala., last June. She was wearing sunscreen with an SPF of 100, a rating that won't be allowed much longer. Dave Martin/AP hide caption

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In the United States, more than 78 million adults and 12 million children are obese. Jessica Dimmock/HBO hide caption

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Pounding Away At America's Obesity Epidemic

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Doctors' Due Diligence: Measuring Kids' Blood Pressure

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Nurse Susan Peel gives a whooping cough vaccination to a high school student in Sacramento, Calif. The whooping cough vaccine given to babies and toddlers loses much of its effectiveness by the time people reach their teens and early adulthood. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Feds Join Fight Against Whooping Cough In Washington

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