Children's Health NPR reports on children's health and medical news including health insurance, new treatments for diseases, and child product safety recalls. Subscribe to the RSS feed.

Decades Later, Drugs Didn't Hold 'Crack Babies' Back

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The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children have no more than two hours a day of "screen time." Marilyn Nieves/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Marilyn Nieves/iStockphoto.com

Can Race, Immigration Status Help Predict Child Well-being?

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A mother and daughter walk home after attending a community meeting about eradicating female genital mutilation in the western Senegalese village of Diabougo. Finbarr O'Reilly/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Finbarr O'Reilly/Reuters /Landov

The X-ray reveals a blowdart lodged in a teenager's windpipe. Reproduced with permission from Pediatrics @AAP hide caption

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Reproduced with permission from Pediatrics @AAP

That flat screen can still be dangerous if it falls off the wall. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

A Yemeni child receives a polio vaccine in the capital city of Sanaa. The Yemen government launched an immunization campaign last month in response to the polio outbreak in neighboring Somalia. Mohammed Huwais/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohammed Huwais/AFP/Getty Images

Polio Eradication Suffers A Setback As Somali Outbreak Worsens

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The FDA's proposal follows concerns raised by consumer groups about levels of inorganic arsenic, a carcinogen, in apple juice. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

How Much Arsenic Is Safe In Apple Juice? FDA Proposes New Rule

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Homicide remains a leading cause of death for young people, even as rates drop. In Chicago, a teenage boy grieves next to a memorial where Ashley Hardmon, 19, was shot and killed on July 2. Gunmen fired while she was chatting with friends. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images