Decades Later, Drugs Didn't Hold 'Crack Babies' Back

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The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children have no more than two hours a day of "screen time." Marilyn Nieves/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Can Race, Immigration Status Help Predict Child Well-being?

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A mother and daughter walk home after attending a community meeting about eradicating female genital mutilation in the western Senegalese village of Diabougo. Finbarr O'Reilly/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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The X-ray reveals a blowdart lodged in a teenager's windpipe. Reproduced with permission from Pediatrics @AAP hide caption

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That flat screen can still be dangerous if it falls off the wall. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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A Yemeni child receives a polio vaccine in the capital city of Sanaa. The Yemen government launched an immunization campaign last month in response to the polio outbreak in neighboring Somalia. Mohammed Huwais/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Polio Eradication Suffers A Setback As Somali Outbreak Worsens

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The FDA's proposal follows concerns raised by consumer groups about levels of inorganic arsenic, a carcinogen, in apple juice. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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How Much Arsenic Is Safe In Apple Juice? FDA Proposes New Rule

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Homicide remains a leading cause of death for young people, even as rates drop. In Chicago, a teenage boy grieves next to a memorial where Ashley Hardmon, 19, was shot and killed on July 2. Gunmen fired while she was chatting with friends. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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