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Girls are much less likely to be diagnosed with autism, but that may be because the signs of the disorder can be less obvious than in boys. And girls may be missing out on help as a result. Sara Wong for NPR hide caption

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Sara Wong for NPR

'Social Camouflage' May Lead To Underdiagnosis Of Autism In Girls

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A growing number of pediatric sports medicine groups warn that when a child focuses on a single sport before age 15 or 16, they increase their risk of injury and burnout — and don't boost their overall success in that sport. Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Hero Images/Getty Images

Student Athletes Who Specialize Early Are Injured More Often, Study Finds

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The Case Of Charlie Gard Divides Doctors And Parents

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Tymia McCullough is a poised, pageant-winning 11-year-old from South Carolina. She also happens to have sickle cell anemia and relies on Medicaid to pay for medical care. Liam James Doyle/NPR hide caption

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Liam James Doyle/NPR

Her Own Medical Future At Stake, A Child Storms Capitol Hill

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Two-year-old Robbie Klein has hemophilia, a medical condition that interferes with his blood's ability to clot normally. Without insurance, the daily medications he needs to stay healthy could cost hundreds of thousands of dollars or more each year. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

In Massachusetts, Proposed Medicaid Cuts Put Kids' Health Care At Risk

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Jack Gilbert, co-author of the book "Dirt Is Good," says kids should be encouraged to get dirty, play with animals and eat colorful vegetables. Elizabethsalleebauer/Getty Images/RooM RF hide caption

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Elizabethsalleebauer/Getty Images/RooM RF

'Dirt Is Good': Why Kids Need Exposure To Germs

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Clara Sunderland was recently born in southern California. Her mom, Wendy, says a breast-feeding support group on Facebook has been crucial to learning how to breast-feed. Courtesy of Wendy Sunderland hide caption

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Courtesy of Wendy Sunderland

Image of a CAR-T cell (reddish) attacking a leukemia cell (green). These CAR-T lymphocytes are used for immunotherapy against cancer (CAR stands for chimeric antigen receptor). After the proliferation of the CAR-expressing T cells, they are transfused back into the patient and can directly detect the cancer cells carrying the antigen. Eye of Science/Science Source hide caption

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Eye of Science/Science Source

'Living Drug' That Fights Cancer By Harnessing Immune System Clears Key Hurdle

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Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder signed legislation on Tuesday creating harsher penalties for doctors, parents and others convicted of female genital mutilation. Above, the state Capitol in Lansing in 2012. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP