Children's Health NPR reports on children's health and medical news including health insurance, new treatments for diseases, and child product safety recalls. Subscribe to the RSS feed.

Daniela Chavarriaga holds her daughter Emma as Dr. Jose Rosa-Olivares administers a measles vaccination at Miami Children's Hospital. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Vaccine Controversies Are As Social As They Are Medical

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Jamira, 11, is an aboriginal girl in Australia. "I like being special," she says. "I like being — you know — different than everyone else." Henrik Nordstrom/I Am Eleven hide caption

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Henrik Nordstrom/I Am Eleven

Respiratory Disease Affects Hundreds Of U.S. Kids

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Wouldn't this salad make a healthful addition to your pizza for dinner? iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Sayonara To 'Super-Size Me'? Food Companies Cut Calories, So Do We

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Students are given healthy choices on a lunch line at Draper Middle School in Rotterdam, N.Y., in 2012. To keep students from tossing out the fruits and vegetables they're served, researchers say it helps to give them a choice in what they put on their trays. Hans Pennink/AP hide caption

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Hans Pennink/AP

Michael Emberley's illustrations, like this one showing an egg traveling through a fallopian tube, make sexual health information accessible to an elementary and middle school audience. But elements of the art, including naked bodies, make some parents uncomfortable. Candlewick Press hide caption

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Candlewick Press

It May Be 'Perfectly Normal', But It's Also Frequently Banned

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Psychologists say spanking and other forms of corporal punishment don't get children to change their behavior for the better. Science Photo Library/Corbis hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Corbis

This human-scale lab rat cage is parked near a skate park in Denver, Colo., to make a point about the lack of science on marijuana. Richard Feldman Studio/Sukle Advertising and Design hide caption

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Richard Feldman Studio/Sukle Advertising and Design

"I want to grow up and become a police. But I need to study in a good school for that. I want to become a police to protect the country." - Fiza, 13 (India) Courtesy of Nike Foundation hide caption

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Courtesy of Nike Foundation

Young poets Monica Mendoza (clockwise from top left), Erica Sheppard McMath, Obasi Davis and Gabriel Cortez have written about how Type 2 diabetes affects their families and communities. Courtesy of The Bigger Picture hide caption

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Courtesy of The Bigger Picture

PCR tests like this can tell if a virus is an enterovirus, but they can't ID the new virus that has caused a surge in serious respiratory infections. BSIP / Science Source hide caption

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BSIP / Science Source