Children's Health NPR reports on children's health and medical news including health insurance, new treatments for diseases, and child product safety recalls. Subscribe to the RSS feed.

The purple-stained Rothia dentocariosa bacteria are frequently found in the human mouth and respiratory tract. CDC hide caption

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CDC

Missing Microbes Provide Clues About Asthma Risk

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Studies May Overstate The Benefits of Talk Therapy For Depression

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The large British study, begun in 1958, tracked the diet, habits and emotional and physical health of thousands of people from childhood through midlife. iStockphoto hide caption

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Childhood Stress May Prime Pump For Chronic Disease Later

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Residents of Flint, Mich. (shown here in January), have been protesting the quality and cost of the city's tap water for more than a year. Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio hide caption

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Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

High Lead Levels In Michigan Kids After City Switches Water Source

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Queen Silvia of Sweden attends the World Childhood Foundation 16th anniversary gala Thursday in New York City. Theo Wargo/Getty Images for World Childhood hide caption

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Theo Wargo/Getty Images for World Childhood

A nurse in Hyderabad, India, gives a vaccine to a child. The immunization will protect against diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus and other diseases. Noah Seelam/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noah Seelam/AFP/Getty Images

Parents In Poor Countries Worry About Vaccines, Too

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In this Sept. 11 photo provided by Emily Morgan, Chase Morgan holds his son Haiden's hand at the Miami Children's Hospital. Emily Morgan, who unexpectedly gave birth on a cruise ship months before her due date, says she wrapped towels around her boy and, with the help of medical staff, managed to keep him alive until the ship reached port. Emily Morgan/AP hide caption

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Emily Morgan/AP

Longer lines in the cafeteria and shorter lunch periods mean many public school students get just 15 minutes to eat. Yet researchers say when kids get less than 20 minutes for lunch, they eat less of everything on their tray. iStockphoto hide caption

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People who have easy access to firearms are about three times more likely to kill themselves than people who don't have access to guns, a recent study from the University of California, San Francisco indicates. iStockphoto hide caption

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When Deciding To Live Means Avoiding Guns

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The federal food stamps program is working to make sure low-income Americans are getting enough calories, but those calories are less nutritious than what everyone else eats, research finds. The USDA is funding programs to try to bridge that gap, such as initiatives that allow food stamp recipients to use their benefits at farmers markets. Allen Breed/AP hide caption

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Allen Breed/AP

Despite all the efforts to get kids to eat more healthfully, the rate of fast-food consumption hasn't budged in the past 15 years, the CDC finds. iStockphoto hide caption

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About A Third Of U.S. Kids And Teens Ate Fast Food Today

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