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Rosendo Gil, a family support worker with the Imperial County, Calif., home visiting program, has visited Blas Lopez and his fiancée Lluvia Padilla dozens of times since their daughter was born three years ago. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

A partial solar eclipse (left) is seen from the Cotswolds, United Kingdom, while a total solar eclipse is seen from Longyearbyen, Norway, in March 2015. Tim Graham/Getty Images/Haakon Mosvold Larsen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Graham/Getty Images/Haakon Mosvold Larsen/AFP/Getty Images

Be Smart: A Partial Eclipse Can Fry Your Naked Eyes

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This sequence of images shows the development of embryos formed after eggs were injected with both CRISPR, a gene-editing tool, and sperm from a donor with a genetic mutation known to cause cardiomyopathy. OHSU hide caption

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OHSU

Exclusive: Inside The Lab Where Scientists Are Editing DNA In Human Embryos

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Matt Twombly for NPR

Probiotic Bacteria Could Protect Newborns From Deadly Infection

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In her book The Virginia State Colony For Epileptics And Feebleminded, poet Molly McCully Brown explores themes of disability, eugenics and faith. Kristin Teston/Persea hide caption

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Kristin Teston/Persea

Poet Imagines Life Inside A 1910 Institution That Eugenics Built

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Linda Cliatt-Wayman on the TED stage. Marla Aufmuth/TED hide caption

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Marla Aufmuth/TED

Listen

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Deona Scott and her son Phoenix at her graduation from Charleston Southern University in South Carolina in 2015. Scott now works full time for Nurse-Family Partnership, a program she credits with helping to prepare her to be a good mother. Courtesy of Deona Scott hide caption

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Courtesy of Deona Scott

Psychologist Jean Twenge says smartphones have brought about dramatic shifts in behavior among the generation of children who grew up with the devices. Image Source/Getty Images hide caption

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Image Source/Getty Images

How Smartphones Are Making Kids Unhappy

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The first sign of successful in vitro fertilization, after co-injection of a gene-correcting enzyme and sperm from a donor with a genetic mutation known to cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Courtesy of OHSU hide caption

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Courtesy of OHSU

Scientists Precisely Edit DNA In Human Embryos To Fix A Disease Gene

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Girls are much less likely to be diagnosed with autism, but that may be because the signs of the disorder can be less obvious than in boys. And girls may be missing out on help as a result. Sara Wong for NPR hide caption

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Sara Wong for NPR

'Social Camouflage' May Lead To Underdiagnosis Of Autism In Girls

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A growing number of pediatric sports medicine groups warn that when a child focuses on a single sport before age 15 or 16, they increase their risk of injury and burnout — and don't boost their overall success in that sport. Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Hero Images/Getty Images

Student Athletes Who Specialize Early Are Injured More Often, Study Finds

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