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Dwayne Stenstrom and his wife, Rose, live on South Dakota's Rosebud reservation, where they raised six children. Also pictured is their granddaughter. John Poole/NPR hide caption

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Improving Foster Care For Native American Kids

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Panel Recommends HPV Vaccine For Boys, Too

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Key Panel Recommends Routine HPV Vaccination For Boys

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For real: Fisher-Price's Laugh & Learn Baby iCan Play Case protects an iPhone while baby plays with apps.

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Brain researchers say the big fluctuations in IQ performance they found in teens were not random — or a fluke.

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IQ Isn't Set In Stone, Suggests Study That Finds Big Jumps, Dips In Teens

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Even with a strong maternal relationship, teenage boys who watch a lot of TV acquire their attitudes toward sex from gender stereotypes seen on the tube, a new study says.

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A pediatrician says parents often mistakenly believe all baby accessories are safe.

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When It Comes To Baby's Crib, Experts Say Go Bare Bones

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A mother held her baby as she received an experimental malaria vaccine at the Walter Reed Project Research Center in Kombewa in Western Kenya in Oct. 2009.

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Karel Prinsloo/AP

Experimental Malaria Vaccine Slashes Infection Risk By Half

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