Delrawn Small's companion Zaquanna Albert, left, and his brother Victor Demsey, center, and Cynthia Howell, right, an advocate with Families United for Justice, an organization made up of families affected by police killings, attend a news conference Thursday July 14, 2016 in New York. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

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Who Is Delrawn Small? Why Some Police Shootings Get Little Media Attention

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Leslie Jones poses backstage during the Sony Pictures Entertainment presentation at CinemaCon 2016, the official convention of the National Association of Theatre Owners, at Caesars Palace on April 12, 2016, in Las Vegas. Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP hide caption

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In a recent interview, Hillary Clinton said she would "call for white people, like myself, to put ourselves in the shoes of those African-American families" — unusually direct language about white people from a major political figure. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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'I'm Petrified For My Children': Will Racism And Guns Lead To America's Ruin?

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Reince Priebus, chairman of the Republican National Committee, speaks to the delegates on start of the first day of the Republican National Convention. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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A car with "#Justice4Philando" written on it is parked outside the funeral of Philando Castile at the Cathedral of St. Paul. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images hide caption

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46 Stops: On 'The Driving Life And Death Of Philando Castile'

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Dr. Brian Williams, a trauma surgeon at Parkland Memorial Hospital, poses for a photo at the hospital, Monday, July 11, 2016, in Dallas. Williams treated some of the Dallas police officers who were shot Thursday night in downtown Dallas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay) Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Treating The Police, Fearing The Police: Dallas Surgeon Brian Williams Reflects

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Dallas Police Chief David Brown (second from left) and Dallas Area Rapid Transit Police Chief James Spiller (second from right) attend an interfaith memorial service for the victims of the Dallas police shooting. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Code Switch Podcast, Episode 8: Black And Blue

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Elie Wiesel speaks at Vermont's Middlebury College in 2002. The Holocaust survivor, Nobel laureate and author died July 2 at the age of 87. Jordan Silverman/Getty Images hide caption

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(Left to right) Patrisse Cullors, Opal Tometi, and Alicia Garza. Courtesy of Patrisse Cullors; Hank Willis Thomas/Courtesy of Opal Tometi; Kristin Little/Courtesy of Alicia Garza hide caption

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Black Lives Matter Founders Describe 'Paradigm Shift' In The Movement

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The Philadelphia group Black Guns Matter offered firearms education and safety training at Philly Fire Arms Academy in May. Bastiaan Slabbers hide caption

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After Dallas, Black Gun Owners Take Stock

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Worshippers bow their heads as the Rev. David A. Keaton leads them in prayer at the Fellowship Missionary Baptist Church in Minneapolis on Sunday. Adrian Florido/NPR hide caption

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Anna Gambucci, protesting at the site of the shooting of Philando Castile. Adrian Florido/NPR hide caption

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Here's What Some Twin Cities Residents Say About Philando Castile's Killing

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People gather in a prayer vigil following the shooting deaths of five police officers in Dallas on Thursday night. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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The Code Switch Podcast Extra: No Words

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Protesters react as police officers arrest a bystander in downtown Dallas following Thursday's shooting. Laura Buckman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Protesters march Wednesday near the convenience store in Baton Rouge, La., where Alton Sterling was shot and killed. Mark Wallheiser/Getty Images hide caption

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At a recent anti-Donald Trump protest in Anaheim, California, this couple said they saved the U.S. flag from a Trump supporter who was trying to get Latinos to trample it. Nervous about giving their full names, he said his was Anthony, and she said she was going by "America." Adrian Florido/NPR hide caption

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The Code Switch Podcast, Episode 7: You're A Grand Old Flag

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