Nadeem Mazen instructs students at a former community space he ran. Samara Vise /Courtesy of JetPac, Inc. hide caption

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Samara Vise /Courtesy of JetPac, Inc.

Students stroll around the campus of Spelman College, a historically black college in Atlanta. Chris Shinn/Courtesy of Spelman College hide caption

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Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences President Cheryl Boone Isaacs speaks onstage during the 88th Annual Academy Awards at the Dolby Theatre on February 28, 2016 in Hollywood, California. Kevin Winter/Getty Images hide caption

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In the first of three conversations about President Barack Obama's racial legacy, Code Switch asks how much was race or racism drove the way the first black president was treated and how he governed. Richie Pope for NPR hide caption

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Richie Pope for NPR

Obama's Legacy: Diss-ent or Diss-respect?

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It's likely that Barack Obama will be known not only as the first black president, but also as the first president of everybody's race. Many Americans and people beyond the U.S. borders have projected their multicultural selves onto the president. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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Chelsea Beck/NPR

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We continue conversations on President Barack Obama's racial legacy--this time, we hear opinions on where he fell short or failed people of color. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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Chelsea Beck/NPR

Obama's Legacy: Callouts and Fallouts

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This week, Code Switch listeners share their concerns and frustrations for the first hundred days of the new presidential administration. Andrew Biraj/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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So, What Are You Afraid of Now?

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Protesters demonstrate as Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi lead members of Congress during a protest on the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Encore Plus: Who Is A Good Immigrant, Anyway?

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Authors Angela Flournoy and Alexander Chee. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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Ten Thousand Writers... and Two Intrepid Podcast Hosts

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Directors of the films "I am Not Your Negro," "Life, Animated," "13th," and "OJ: Made In America" are all up for Academy Awards in the Best Documentary Feature category. They are also all filmmakers of color. For the first time, African-American documentarians made up most of the nominees. Courtesy of Magnolia Pictures, A&E IndieFilms, Netflix, and ESPN Films hide caption

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Courtesy of Magnolia Pictures, A&E IndieFilms, Netflix, and ESPN Films

Oscars So Black...At Least, In Documentaries

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Writer, director, producer Jordan Peele directs a scene on the set of his new horror movie, Get Out. Justin Lubin/Universal Pictures hide caption

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The Horror, The Horror: "Get Out" And The Place of Race in Scary Movies

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Jane Givens searches for her father, Phil, and sister, Biddy, through an ad placed in Cincinnati's The Colored Citizen in 1866. Courtesy of Last Seen hide caption

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Courtesy of Last Seen

After Slavery, Searching For Loved Ones In Wanted Ads

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Protesters march in New York's Times Square on February 19, 2017, in solidarity with American Muslims and against the travel ban ordered by President Donald Trump. Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Led by women in pink "pussy hats," hundreds of thousands of people packed the streets of Washington and other cities in a massive outpouring of opposition to America's new president, Donald Trump. Jason Redmond/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Pribilof Island residents evacuated on U.S. Army Transport Delarof, in June 1942. National Archives, General Records of the Department of the Navy hide caption

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National Archives, General Records of the Department of the Navy

Vintage Seminole patchwork on display at the home of Patsy West, in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Courtesy of Will O'Leary hide caption

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Courtesy of Will O'Leary

Seminole Patchwork: Admiration And Appropriation

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John Lu (left), Reynold Liang (center) and David Wu (right) during a news conference in Queens, N.Y., after being the victims of a hate crime in 2006. New York City council member David Weprin (second left) and John C. Liu look on. Adam Rountree/AP hide caption

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