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Leonard Nimoy's Advice To A Biracial Girl In 1968

It wasn't supposed to be "Leonard Nimoy + Biracial Kids Day" here at Code Switch, but the news takes you where it takes you.

BuzzFeed's Leonora Epstein uncovered this blog post from the blog My Star Trek Scrapbook, which features a letter from a 1968 issue of the defunct teen magazine FaVE! In a letter addressed to Mr. Spock, a young biracial girl laments that she doesn't fit in with either her black or her white peers.

"I know that you are half Vulcan and half human and you have suffered because of this," the girl named F.C. wrote. "My mother is Negro and my father is white and I am told this makes me a half-breed. ... I guess I'll never have any friends."

Nimoy was so moved by the letter that he responded at length in the next issue. "[Spock] said to himself: 'Not everyone will like me,' " Nimoy wrote. "But there will be those who will accept me just for who I am."

Read the whole exchange below:

A young girl with a white father and a black mother wrote to the half-Vulcan, half-human Spock for advice on fitting in. i

A young girl with a white father and a black mother wrote to the half-Vulcan, half-human Spock for advice on fitting in. FaVE! Magazine, via My Star Trek Scrapbook hide caption

toggle caption FaVE! Magazine, via My Star Trek Scrapbook
A young girl with a white father and a black mother wrote to the half-Vulcan, half-human Spock for advice on fitting in.

A young girl with a white father and a black mother wrote to the half-Vulcan, half-human Spock for advice on fitting in.

FaVE! Magazine, via My Star Trek Scrapbook
Nimoy wrote to the young girl that Spock "decided he would live up to his own personal value and uniqueness." i

Nimoy wrote to the young girl that Spock "decided he would live up to his own personal value and uniqueness." FaVE! Magazine, via My Star Trek Scrapbook hide caption

toggle caption FaVE! Magazine, via My Star Trek Scrapbook
Nimoy wrote to the young girl that Spock "decided he would live up to his own personal value and uniqueness."

Nimoy wrote to the young girl that Spock "decided he would live up to his own personal value and uniqueness."

FaVE! Magazine, via My Star Trek Scrapbook

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