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The Horror, The Horror: "Get Out" And The Place of Race in Scary Movies

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The Horror, The Horror: "Get Out" And The Place of Race in Scary Movies

The Horror, The Horror: "Get Out" And The Place of Race in Scary Movies

Writer, director, producer Jordan Peele directs a scene on the set of his new horror movie, Get Out. Justin Lubin/Universal Pictures hide caption

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Justin Lubin/Universal Pictures

Writer, director, producer Jordan Peele directs a scene on the set of his new horror movie, Get Out.

Justin Lubin/Universal Pictures

The Horror, The Horror: "Get Out" And The Place of Race in Scary Movies

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/516826160/516826181" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

It's one of the oldest clich├ęs of horror movies: the black guy dies first. But that's not the case in the new film "Get Out," written and directed by Jordan Peele (best known for the Comedy Central series "Key And Peele"). Gene and guest host Eric Deggans chat with Peele about his new film, check in with African-American filmmaker Ernest Dickerson, who's directed many scary movies and TV shows, and dive deep into race in horror-movie history with Robin Means Coleman, who's been analyzing and writing about the genre for over a decade.