The Slants' frontman, Simon Tam, filed the original lawsuit after the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office kept the band from registering its name. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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What's Next For The Founder Of The Slants, And The Fight Over Racial Slurs

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The Code Switch podcast is celebrating its first anniversary. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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From Mourning to 'Moonlight': A Year In Race, As Told By Code Switch

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"Racial impostor syndrome" is definitely a thing for many people. We hear from biracial and multi-ethnic listeners who connect with feeling "fake" or inauthentic in some part of their racial or ethnic heritage. Kristen Uroda for NPR hide caption

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'Racial Impostor Syndrome': Here Are Your Stories

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Kenya Barris is the executive producer of the family comedy Blackish and Shahidi plays Zoe, the eldest daughter in the Johnson family. There are hopes for a spin-off starring Shahidi's character going off to college. Meanwhile, Barris is piloting a few other TV shows for the fall-- including a comedy starring Felicity Huffman and Courtney B. Vance. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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Talking Black-ish With Star Yara Shahidi And Creator Kenya Barris

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Yara Shahidi has to navigate complex racial issues both inside and outside the world of Black-ish. Rich Fury/Getty Images hide caption

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Martin Sostre on Feb. 12, 1976 — the same week he was released from prison after he was granted executive clemency by the governor of New York. Vic DeLucia/The New York Post via Getty Images hide caption

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How One Inmate Changed The Prison System From The Inside

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Comics and graphic novels have become a flourishing space for explorations of race and identity. But what are the compromises they have to make to reach and please wide audiences? Shannon Wright for NPR hide caption

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Changing Colors In Comics

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Sanctuary Churches: Who Controls The Story?

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In the first of three conversations about President Barack Obama's racial legacy, Code Switch asks how much was race or racism drove the way the first black president was treated and how he governed. Richie Pope for NPR hide caption

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Obama's Legacy: Diss-ent or Diss-respect?

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It's likely that Barack Obama will be known not only as the first black president, but also as the first president of everybody's race. Many Americans and people beyond the U.S. borders have projected their multicultural selves onto the president. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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We continue conversations on President Barack Obama's racial legacy--this time, we hear opinions on where he fell short or failed people of color. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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Obama's Legacy: Callouts and Fallouts

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This week, Code Switch listeners share their concerns and frustrations for the first hundred days of the new presidential administration. Andrew Biraj/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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So, What Are You Afraid of Now?

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Protesters demonstrate as Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi lead members of Congress during a protest on the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Encore Plus: Who Is A Good Immigrant, Anyway?

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Authors Angela Flournoy and Alexander Chee. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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Ten Thousand Writers... and Two Intrepid Podcast Hosts

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Directors of the films "I am Not Your Negro," "Life, Animated," "13th," and "OJ: Made In America" are all up for Academy Awards in the Best Documentary Feature category. They are also all filmmakers of color. For the first time, African-American documentarians made up most of the nominees. Courtesy of Magnolia Pictures, A&E IndieFilms, Netflix, and ESPN Films hide caption

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Courtesy of Magnolia Pictures, A&E IndieFilms, Netflix, and ESPN Films

Oscars So Black...At Least, In Documentaries

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Writer, director, producer Jordan Peele directs a scene on the set of his new horror movie, Get Out. Justin Lubin/Universal Pictures hide caption

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The Horror, The Horror: "Get Out" And The Place of Race in Scary Movies

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Rapper Tupac Shakur arrives at New York's Radio City Music Hall on Sept. 4, 1996. Todd Plitt/AP hide caption

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Episode 17: Why Do We Still Care About Tupac?

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Tika Sumpter and Parker Sawyers in Southside With You. Pat Scola/Courtesy of Miramax and Roadside Attractions hide caption

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'Southside With You' Has Us Asking: Where Is The Love In Black Movies?

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Nate Parker attends the The Birth Of A Nation premiere during the 2016 Sundance Film Festival. Nicholas Hunt/Getty Images hide caption

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Nate Parker's Past, His Present, And The Future of 'Birth Of A Nation': Episode 14

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Wilkinsburg High School's class of 2016, its last graduating class after over a century in operation. Shereen Marisol Meraji/NPR hide caption

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Episode 13: Struggling School, Or Sanctuary?

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It's been a heady season for race reporting, with several much-scrutinized cases of police violence and Donald Trump, the Republican presidential nominee, espousing anti-immigrant rhetoric. Nicole Xu for NPR hide caption

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Reporting While Brown In The Summer Of Trump: Episode 11

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