Syracuse coach Jim Boeheim (above), two days after sexual abuse allegations against a former assistant were made public, and Detroit Mayor Dave Bing (below), during a youth leadership event last year, played alongside each other in the 1960s. Nate Shron/Getty Images hide caption

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A holiday shopper at the Toys R Us in New York's Times Square. Andrew Burton/AP hide caption

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Florida players (from left) Taurean Green, Corey Brewer, Walter Hodge, Joakim Noah and Marreese Speights hold up the Southeastern Conference sign after defeating Arkansas in the SEC basketball tournament championship game at the Georgia Dome in Atlanta in 2007. John Bazemore/AP hide caption

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Sweetness And Light

Frank Deford: In With The South, Out With The East

In sports, the SEC is very popular these days, especially in football. But, as Frank Deford points out, it's hard times for members of the Big East.

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President Obama salutes service members from both sides of the Atlantic as he walks with French President Nicolas Sarkozy during the G-20 summit in Cannes, France, last week. Markus Schreiber/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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French President Nicolas Sarkozy reportedly made a comment that German Chancellor Angela Merkel ate a "second helping of cheese," even though she says she's on a diet.

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Fans who are tired of the NBA lockout can get some basketball entertainment from a new show, Lysistrata Jones, which opens on Broadway next month.

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Sweetness And Light

The (Basketball) Show Must Go On

It's a desperate time for fans of the NBA. Frank Deford provides an alternative entertainment idea for basketball junkies.

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Siri's answer to the meaning of life is actually kind of impressive.

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A Phiten necklace flies around the neck of Milwaukee Brewers relief pitcher Chris Narveson as he throws during Game 3 of the National League Championship Series against the St. Louis Cardinals on Wednesday.

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It's hard to relate America's love for the NFL to the broader national temperament — but the league now dominates all sports. Here, a young Oakland Raiders fan watches his team on a recent Sunday.

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Messages posted on a glass window pay tribute to the late Apple co-founder Steve Jobs outside the Apple store in Hong Kong.

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Despite the popularity of college football, according to Frank Deford, only 14 athletic departments show a profit. Why? Because football has to cover the costs of the college sports that lose money.

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The Chicago Bears showed some skills off the field and on the stage in 1985 when they recorded the "Super Bowl Shuffle." Paul Natkin/NFL via Getty hide caption

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The fifth-graders from L.A.'s Pico Union neighborhood, who rarely get to spend time in nature, say it was the best field trip ever. Mandalit del Barco/NPR hide caption

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A new study says that being a father can change you. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Simon Says

Fatherhood, Not Testosterone, Makes The Man

A new study says that when men become fathers, our testosterone levels drop. Like a brick. I doubt that many fathers are surprised.

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