Concerts Performances from today's top artists, filmed at venues and festivals across the country.

Taj Mahal. Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage hide caption

toggle caption Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage

Taj Mahal On Mountain Stage

Taj Mahal's influences are drawn from many places around the world, from California to Africa to the Pacific Islands. But in this Mountain Stage performance from 1995, he pays tribute to his roots.

Taj Mahal On Mountain Stage

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/180039258/179860680" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Richie Havens. Brian Blauser hide caption

toggle caption Brian Blauser

Richie Havens On Mountain Stage

Havens' unmistakable guitar style and intense vocals helped make him an influential folksinger. In this concert from 1995, Havens — who died April 22 at age 72 — plays some of his best-known songs.

Richie Havens On Mountain Stage

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/179824513/179828500" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Iggy & The Stooges live from (Le) Poisson Rouge in New York City. Ryan Muir for NPR hide caption

toggle caption Ryan Muir for NPR

Iggy And The Stooges, Live In Concert

WNYC Soundcheck

NPR Music and WNYC's Soundcheck present a First Listen Live concert from Iggy & The Stooges. Watch the group rip through songs from its new album, Ready to Die, as well as a handful of favorites.

Blue Yonder performs live on Mountain Stage. Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage hide caption

toggle caption Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage

Blue Yonder On Mountain Stage

The West Virginia trio fuses country, honky-tonk and jazz during this home-state set. Though this is their first time on Mountain Stage, two of its members have made dozens of appearances on the show.

Blue Yonder On Mountain Stage

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/179005064/178606120" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Allison Miller leads Boom Tic Boom at the Kennedy Center during the Mary Lou Williams Women in Jazz Festival. Margot Schulman/Courtesy of the Kennedy Center hide caption

toggle caption Margot Schulman/Courtesy of the Kennedy Center

Allison Miller's Boom Tic Boom On JazzSet

WBGO

This is the set by Allison Miller and her Boom Tic Boom project that became the hit of the 2012 Mary Lou Williams Women in Jazz Festival. Players pair off and rejoin, chase one another and catch up.

Allison Miller's Boom Tic Boom On JazzSet

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/155923412/178803326" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The Chapin Sisters' Abigail and Lily Chapin perform live on Mountain Stage. Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage hide caption

toggle caption Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage

The Chapin Sisters On Mountain Stage

Abigail and Lily Chapin have music in their genes. Here, the duo plays songs from its new covers album, A Date With the Everly Brothers.

Corb Lund performs live on Mountain Stage. Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage hide caption

toggle caption Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage

Corb Lund On Mountain Stage

The Canadian singer-songwriter combines cowboy music, Western swing and rockabilly to create a unique blend of country. Here, Lund plays songs from his most recent album, Cabin Fever.

Corb Lund On Mountain Stage

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/178593746/178405115" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Buddy Miller and Jim Lauderdale performing live on Mountain Stage. Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage hide caption

toggle caption Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage

Buddy Miller & Jim Lauderdale On Mountain Stage

The pair wanted to make an album together for years. In 2012, they finally had three days off at the same time and recorded Buddy & Jim, a collection of duets. Here, they play selections from it.

Buddy Miller & Jim Lauderdale On Mountain Stage

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/178405662/178404456" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The Dresden Staatskapelle's principal conductor, Christian Thielemann, asserts that Anton Bruckner's music, in its long-winding search for beauty, is the perfect antidote for modern life. He and the orchestra brought Bruckner's Symphony No. 8 to Carnegie Hall on April 19, 2013. Melanie Burford for NPR hide caption

toggle caption Melanie Burford for NPR

Carnegie Hall Live: Dresden Staatskapelle Plays Bruckner

WQXR radio

When the orchestra brings Bruckner's Eighth Symphony to New York, listeners hear an ensemble comfortable with the composer's quirks and thrills. Hear what one critic calls a "mesmerizing experience."

Carnegie Hall Live: Dresden Staatskapelle Plays Bruckner

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/177366751/178460690" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Shovels and Rope performs live on Mountain Stage. Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage hide caption

toggle caption Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage

Shovels And Rope On Mountain Stage

Michael Trent and Cary Ann Hearst are a married couple, but they only began playing music together in 2010. Here, the two play buoyant roots-rock songs from their debut album, O' Be Joyful.

Shovels And Rope On Mountain Stage

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/177929099/177326316" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">