Concerts Performances from today's top artists, filmed at venues and festivals across the country.

The Blind Boys of Alabama. Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage hide caption

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Blind Boys Of Alabama On Mountain Stage

The legendary soul-gospel group has performed for the past three U.S. presidents and won six Grammys. Here, its members perform songs from their latest album, produced by Bon Iver's Justin Vernon.

Blind Boys Of Alabama On Mountain Stage

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Amir ElSaffar performs at the 2013 Newport Jazz Festival. Adam Kissick for NPR hide caption

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Amir ElSaffar And Two Rivers On JazzSet

WBGO

Marvel at the musical flow — even in non-Western modes and odd, long meters at breakneck speeds — in this set, recorded live at the Newport Jazz Festival.

Amir ElSaffar And Two Rivers On JazzSet

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Norah Jones performs at Blue Note at 75, The Concert. NPR hide caption

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Norah Jones' Dream Band

At her record company's 75th-anniversary gala, the singer-songwriter performs with her labelmates — some of whom, like Wayne Shorter and Jason Moran, happen to be modern jazz stars.

Wayne Shorter Revises Himself

During the '60s, Shorter came to the fore not only as a saxophonist, but as a composer with a sixth sense for how to break the rules of harmony. His band launches new ideas off old themes in concert.

Lou Donaldson and Dr. Lonnie Smith perform at Blue Note At 75, The Concert. NPR hide caption

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Salty Laughs And A Greasy Helping Of The Blues

In the '50s, '60s and beyond, they were among the artists who defined hard bop and soul jazz. They revisit the hits in concert, but not without some chortling commentary from Sweet Poppa Lou.

McCoy Tyner and Bobby Hutcherson perform at Blue Note at 75, The Concert. NPR hide caption

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A Half-Century Of Collaboration In Duet

They first recorded together in 1966, around the time both were signed to Blue Note Records. The pianist and vibraphone player have been working together ever since. Watch a duet performance.

Estonian composer Arvo Pärt's music is celebrated at the Metropolitan Museum of Art with a performance of his choral work Kanon Pokajanen at the Temple of Dendur. Kristian Juul Pedersen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Music By Arvo Pärt, From The Met Museum

Q2

Watch the Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir perform an extended piece derived from an ancient canon of repentance. Unfolding as a long prayer, the music is rich, multilayered and mesmerizing.

Music By Arvo Pärt, From The Met Museum's Temple Of Dendur

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Paul Cebar. Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage hide caption

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Paul Cebar Tomorrow Sound On Mountain Stage

The funky singer-songwriter plays songs from his latest album with Tomorrow Sound, Fine Rude Thing. Hear the Wisconsin native perform live onstage in Athens, Ohio.

Paul Cebar Tomorrow Sound On Mountain Stage

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Ray Anderson (right) leads his scaled-down Pocket Brass Band at the 2013 Newport Jazz Festival. Adam Kissick for NPR hide caption

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Ray Anderson's 'Sweet Chicago Suite' On JazzSet

WBGO

Anderson shares his "musical memoir" of growing up in 1960s Chicago with a live version of his Sweet Chicago Suite at the Newport Jazz Festival.

Ray Anderson's 'Sweet Chicago Suite' On JazzSet

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Frank Vignola and Vinny Raniolo perform on Mountain Stage. Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage hide caption

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Frank Vignola And Vinny Raniolo On Mountain Stage

Technically gifted guitarists with considerable on-stage charisma, both men are respected and versatile jazz players. Here, they perform live on stage in Athens, Ohio.

Frank Vignola And Vinny Raniolo On Mountain Stage

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