NPR logo What $700B Means In Ferraris, Donkeys And Clones

Economy

What $700B Means In Ferraris, Donkeys And Clones

As the nation pondered the figure $700 billion today, some of us here at Day to Day were embracing the fact that we didn't pursue a career in mathematics. $700 billion is a tricky number to understand, but we tried. Here's some of what we came up with:

$700 billion could buy 700,000 Ferrari Enzos (even though there were only 400 ever made). That's one for every person in Alaska. Sarah Palin would not approve.

Ferraris In Alaska

NPR Composite Of AP Photos

$700 billion could buy a laptop for every child (age 5-19) in the whole wide world. With all that great online learning going on, perhaps one of those children could come up with a solution to solve Wall Street's woes.

Laptops for the world

Martin Mejia/Getty

Why take $700 billion in check form when you could take it in hundred dollar bills? If you were to pick up that massive bag of cash — what would it feel like? About the same as lifting 1400 African bull elephants or 51,330 adult domesticated donkeys. (Note: we apologize for the mathematical inaccuracy of the photos — this one apparently still has some growing up to do:

Donkey and Elephant

Dale Arnold/AP

Let's say the Treasury department decides to go all environmental on us and use a single printer to produce the $100 bills necessary to "save America's future." How long would it take to print? At a rate of $1/second — it would take 220 years working 24-7. At which point, we're guessing, $700 billion would only buy a single Ferrari Enzo.

Lots of Money

Chung Sung-Jun/Getty

$700 billion is the value of 12 Bill Gates — although for significantly less the tech mastermind himself could be cloned that many times.

12 Bill Gates

Gabriel Bouys/Getty

What's your reference point for $700 billion? Give us something better than these and we'll try to incorporate them into a gallery on Monday.

NPR thanks our sponsors

About