Ludwig's Links: What Would Beethoven Read Online? Oct. 22, 2010 : Deceptive Cadence Conductors are getting younger, and musicians are still striking -- but the big news is the Chopin competition. Find out what's happening on the classical web.
NPR logo Ludwig's Links: What Would Beethoven Read Online? Oct. 22, 2010

Ludwig's Links: What Would Beethoven Read Online? Oct. 22, 2010

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Good old Ludwig.
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This is what happened in classical music this week:

  • Unexpected Result: The winner of prestigious Chopin Competition has been announced — and it wasn't who most people thought it would be. Jessica Duchen doesn't pretend to like the result.
  • An Indefensible Position: As the Detroit Symphony strike enters its third week, Mark Gaffney criticizes the orchestra management's decisions.
  • Questions in wake of an audition: The Philadelphia Inquirer’s Peter Dobin questions whether auditions are truly as objective as orchestras claim. The answer? Probably not.
  • Latin American High Note: Mark Swed of the L.A. Times examines the huge success of Daniel Catan’s new opera, Il Postino.
  • The World's Fastest Bumblebee: Violinist Oliver Lewis played Rimsky-Korsakov’s Flight Of The Bumblebee in just over one minute, setting a new world record. It’s actually not bad.
  • New Appointment: Neeme Jarvi, a star conductor of the Soviet era, has been named artistic director of Switzerland's Suisse Romande Orchestra.
  • Possible Reality Show: One of eight guest conductors of the Colorado Symphony could be its next leader.
  • For Pianists: Here's a huge interactive collection of Chopin manuscripts. Only click if you have hours to watch and listen.
  • Strikingly Modern: The Guardian posted a haunting, little known song that might challenge everything you thought about Edward Elgar’s music.
  • The Original Three Tenors: Ian Bostridge makes a case for the undiscovered music written for the tenor voice in the baroque era.