NPR logo White Light Festival's 'Credo' Concert Webcast Live Monday, Nov. 15 At 7:30 P.M., EST

White Light Festival's 'Credo' Concert Webcast Live Monday, Nov. 15 At 7:30 P.M., EST

The White Light Festival, a new fall event from Lincoln Center, gathers musicians from both the classical and pop music worlds. iStock hide caption

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The White Light Festival, a new fall event from Lincoln Center, gathers musicians from both the classical and pop music worlds.

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(Click Here, To Visit Q2, For Tonight's Live Concert)

Q2, the contemporary music stream from WQXR, brings Icelandic art-rock together with a wild constellation of top-notch, international ensembles in a live audio webcast Monday, Nov. 15 at 7:30 p.m. EST.

The concert, titled Credo, is hosted by WNYC's John Schaefer from the Church of St. Paul the Apostle, in New York. Q2's Nadia Sirota will host a live web chat during the performance.

Featuring music written over a span of 600 years, one might suspect Credo to present a sort of buffet of styles. But, excitingly, all of the musicians involved create music that feels emotionally linked up; while not overtly spiritual, this music is personal, contemplative, and introverted.

The work that opens the program, In Hydraulis, written around 1467 by the French composer Antoine Busnois, is a perfect example. It's a secular work that comes across as near-minimalism, written in tribute to Busnois' colleague Johannes Ockeghem.

The framing of a musical work, the venue where one catches a show, or the radio station on which a piece is heard, is sometimes more responsible for our understanding of its genre than the work's musical content.

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Such is decidedly the case for the two Icelandic composers featured on this concert, Kjartan Sveinsson and Jonsi Birgisson. Best known for their work with the band Sigur Rós, they are both technically branching out from the world of popular music into the world of concert music, in some cases simply by means of expanded orchestration.

While much of Sigur Ros, unaltered, would sit well on many contemporary classical concerts, it will be exciting to discover how their writing will respond to the expanded palate afforded by the Wordless Music Orchestra and the Latvian National Choir.