NPR logo Around The Classical Internet: June 24, 2011

Music Articles

Around The Classical Internet: June 24, 2011

All the news that's fit to link.
Guillermo Perales/iStock
All the news that's fit to link.
Guillermo Perales/iStock
  • The Syracuse Symphony has been in bankruptcy court this week, and there is "nothing for the hundreds of unpaid vendors and staff and people who bought concert tickets they could not use."
  • In Syracuse, "there are 559 unsecured creditors, ranging from a $2.7 million debt to the musicians' pension fund to $20 tickets for canceled concerts."
  • The Detroit Symphony Orchestra has seen significant jumps in both donations and ticket sales since their strike.
  • The Philadelphia Inquirer gives a detailed catalog of the Philadelphia Orchestra's finances, as reported in their Chapter 11 filing.
  • In Philadelphia, they've raised just over $11 million in outright gifts, and have the potential to reap more than $30 million before the end of this year.
  • The 2011 NEA opera honorees have been announced, and are prominent stage designer John Conklin, Seattle Opera general director Speight Jenkins, mezzo-soprano Risë Stevens and Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Robert Ward.
  • A meeting between unions and the New York City Opera led to a bit of a leak regarding next season's programming.
  • EMI's up for sale. Yes, again.
  • The Lady Blunt Strad sold at auction for $15.9M to an anonymous bidder — a record price, and the second time this fiddle has broken sales records. Proceeds from this sale are going toward disaster relief in Japan.
  • The clear winner at Cardiff: 24-year-old Moldovan soprano Valentina Nafornita, who also earned the audience prize.
  • Is Charles Dutoit creating something of a Korean counterpart to the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra?
  • Speaking of Daniel Barenboim, he's just been knighted.
  • You think you hate cell phones ringing at concerts? Maybe not so much as Peter Maxwell Davies, who's called miscreant mobile owners "artistic terrorists." He'd also like offenders to pay fines.
  • A British reporter's time spent with Nico Muhly: "Sarah Palin's America might as well be another planet."

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