Around The Classical Internet: November 25, 2011 : Deceptive Cadence Three passings, advances in musical technology and a hard-to-fill job: all the news that's fit to link.
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Around The Classical Internet: November 25, 2011

Sena Jurinac as Octavian and Elisabeth Schwarzkopf as the Marschallin in 'Der Rosenkavalier' at Covent Garden, 1959. Evening Standard/Getty Images hide caption

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Evening Standard/Getty Images

Sena Jurinac as Octavian and Elisabeth Schwarzkopf as the Marschallin in 'Der Rosenkavalier' at Covent Garden, 1959.

Evening Standard/Getty Images
  • We mark the passings this week of two very different sopranos: Catalan early music expert Montserrat Figueras and the Bosnian-born opera star Sena Jurinac.
  • And the founder of New York City's floating concert hall Bargemusic, Olga Bloom, passed away on Thanksgiving. She was 92 years old.
  • Is it ironic that Jeffrey Kahane, who just led a historically informed practice-style performance of Mozart at the New York Philharmonic, read his score from an iPad perched atop his harpsichord?
  • In Montreal, a man who trained as a violinist and is now paralyzed from the neck down will be playing a violin concerto. He is debuting the Virtual Music Instrument he helped develop as a graduate student in engineering.
  • First there was Google Music; now on the way is Google Culture.
  • Know anyone who might like the job of top exec at the New York Philharmonic? Because apparently six people have turned down the chance to succeed Zarin Mehta as the Phil's president and CEO.
  • Among the signatories of Occupy Musicians: composers Frederic Rzewski, Pauline Oliveros, Kyle Gann, Missy Mazzoli, Tyondai Braxton, Daniel Felsenfeld and Judd Greenstein.
  • Canadians are playing Mozart in bars. This is getting to be a trope: Tux-less equals "revolution."