A Syrian woman and her child sit in their refugee living space in Lebanon. They are featured in Four Walls, a virtual reality presentation by the International Rescue Committee. YouVisit Studios hide caption

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YouVisit Studios

Can Virtual Reality Make You More Empathetic?

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Using Social Media, Students Aspire To Become 'Influencers'

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Josuhe Pagliery grew up playing video games on consoles he says were not common in Cuba. Those games helped inspire him to develop Savior, Cuba's first independent video game. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Amid Isolation, 2 Cubans Develop Island's First Video Game

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The new law was prompted by concerns over the intrusion of work into private lives. Carlina Teteris/Getty Images hide caption

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Carlina Teteris/Getty Images

For French Law On Right To 'Disconnect,' Much Support — And A Few Doubts

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People in Shanghai overlook the financial district in June 2016. The Shanghai city government recently released an app that produces a "public credit score" for residents. A good score can lead to discounts, but a bad score can cause problems. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

What's Your 'Public Credit Score'? The Shanghai Government Can Tell You

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Amazon Echo Murder Case Renews Privacy Questions Prompted By Our Digital Footprints

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The top 20 most popular stories from the past year ranged from fact checks to mosquito bites, from Aleppo to taxes, and how to raise kids who will thrive, whatever the future brings. (From left) Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images; Felipe Dana/AP; Joe Raedle/Getty Images; Phelan M. Ebenhack/AP hide caption

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(From left) Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images; Felipe Dana/AP; Joe Raedle/Getty Images; Phelan M. Ebenhack/AP

Large portions of the Internet have declared 2016 one of the worst years ever. But 2017 hasn't gotten here yet, so let's all just simmer down. Luciano Lozano/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Luciano Lozano/Getty Images/Ikon Images

New Orleans Residents Share Decades Of Photos With The Same Santa

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