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A sign near the entrance of the Facebook campus in Menlo Park, Calif. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

Searching For 'Facebook Customer Service' Can Lead To A Scam

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Multiple Twitter accounts claiming to be run by members of the National Park Service and other U.S. agencies have appeared since the Trump administration's apparent gag order. The account owners are choosing to remain anonymous. David Calvert/Getty Images hide caption

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David Calvert/Getty Images

Merriam-Webster's Twitter account weighs in on trending words and phrases and has waded into linguistic matters in politics, including a big campaign question: Did Donald Trump say "bigly" or "big league"? Marian Carrasquero/NPR hide caption

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Marian Carrasquero/NPR

Apple CEO Tim Cook introduces the new Apple TV app during a product launch event in Cupertino, Calif., in October. The company now plans to make original movies and TV programming, according to sources. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

Apple Looks To Compete With Netflix Originals, But Making Hits Is Hard

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Computer scientist Avi Rubin speaking at TEDxMidAtlantic. Chris Suspect/TED hide caption

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Chris Suspect/TED

What Happens When Hackers Hijack Our Smart Devices?

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Newly hired Spokane County Sheriff's Deputy Russell Aldrich chats with strangers in a shopping mall. The exercise is meant to help rookies build up the subtle people skills that older police trainers claim are lacking among many millennial recruits. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Martin Kaste/NPR

In Social Media Age, Young Cops Get Trained For Real-Life Conversation

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A Syrian woman and her child sit in their refugee living space in Lebanon. They are featured in Four Walls, a virtual reality presentation by the International Rescue Committee. YouVisit Studios hide caption

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YouVisit Studios

Can Virtual Reality Make You More Empathetic?

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Using Social Media, Students Aspire To Become 'Influencers'

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Josuhe Pagliery grew up playing video games on consoles he says were not common in Cuba. Those games helped inspire him to develop Savior, Cuba's first independent video game. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Amid Isolation, 2 Cubans Develop Island's First Video Game

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