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A Neuroscientist Weighs In: Why Do We Disagree On The Color Of The Dress?

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A man takes a "selfie" while waiting in line to cast his vote in the Wisconsin gubernatorial race in November. Darren Hauck/Getty Images hide caption

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Darren Hauck/Getty Images

'Ballot Selfies' Clash With The Sanctity Of Secret Polling

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At the start of a meeting to decide the issue of net neutrality, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler (center) holds hands with FCC Commissioners Mignon Clyburn (left) and Jessica Rosenworcel at the FCC headquarters Thursday. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Republicans in Congress are no fans of FCC Chairman Thomas Wheeler's "net neutrality" plan. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

On Net Neutrality, Republicans Pitch Oversight Rather Than Regulation

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T-Mobile CEO John Legere pitches a plan that allows unlimited music streaming without additional data charges. Some net neutrality proponents want the FCC to limit plans like these; the commission says it will review them on a case-by-case basis. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

What Net Neutrality Rules Could Mean For Your Wireless Carrier

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Guido Rosa/Getty Images/Ikon Images

The World Loves The Smartphone. So How About A Smart Home?

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With the technology to conduct more nuanced tests, some companies say they can provide more useful detail about how people think in dynamic situations. Marcus Butt/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Marcus Butt/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Recruiting Better Talent With Brain Games And Big Data

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A Stolen iPhone, A New Connection And Minor Celebrity In China

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President Obama, joined by Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson (left), delivers remarks at the National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center on Jan. 13 in Arlington, Va. Obama discussed efforts to improve the government's ability to collaborate with industry to combat cyber threats. Kristoffer Tripplaar-Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Kristoffer Tripplaar-Pool/Getty Images

As Homeland Security Steps Up Cybercrime Fight, Tech Industry Wary

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The new emojis on Apple's operating system are racially diverse and they also feature a diverse group of families. courtesy of 9to5mac hide caption

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courtesy of 9to5mac

In Beta Release, Apple Introduces New, Racially Diverse Emojis

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Some colleges and police departments are starting to use software that scans social media to identify local threats, but most tips still come from members of the public. Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Ikon Images/Getty Images

Awash In Social Media, Cops Still Need The Public To Detect Threats

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They might be hard to remember sometimes, but good passwords may be the best defense against hackers. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

You Might Want To Take Another Pass At Your Passwords

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