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Ford Replaces CD Player With Streaming Music In New Vehicle

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Lester "J.R." Packingham speaks Monday on the front steps of the Supreme Court. He was convicted of statutory rape in 2002, and arrested years later under a law barring sex offenders from social media platforms. Lauren Russell/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Russell/NPR

Privacy Paradox: How To Gain More Control Over Your Data

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Facebook claims to have 1.23 billion daily users globally. Mark Zuckerberg recently announced that he wants that number to grow and for users to conduct their digital lives only on his platform. bombuscreative/iStock hide caption

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Facebook Wants Great Power, But What About Responsibility?

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The original caption for this photo of the Nokia 3310, which was released on Sept. 1, 2000, noted that the phone had advanced features like "voice dialing, picture messaging, predictive text input and games." No camera, though. And no Siri. Science & Society Picture Library/SSPL via Getty Images hide caption

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Science & Society Picture Library/SSPL via Getty Images

Felix Kjellberg, better known as PewDiePie, signs copies of his book This Book Loves You at a Barnes & Noble in New York City in 2015. John Lamparski/Getty Images hide caption

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John Lamparski/Getty Images

'Aisles Have Eyes' Warns That Brick-And-Mortar Stores Are Watching You

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