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A California driver who received a ticket for wearing a Google Glass headset this week says the existing laws are unclear. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

Steve Jobs' House In Los Altos Designated A Historic Site

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Rep. Mike Rogers, R-Mich., asks about website security questions Wednesday at a House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on problems with HealthCare.gov. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Add Security To The List Of HealthCare.gov Tech Issues

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He's not checking your blood glucose levels. He's playing Words with Friends. Anna Zielinska/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Anna Zielinska/iStockphoto.com

Joseph Kony, the Ugandan leader of the Lord's Resistance Army, is being pursued by U.S. Special Forces and African armies. If he can raise enough money, adventurer Robert Young Pelton will be tracking him, too. STR/AP hide caption

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STR/AP

The Ask.fm website has been linked to two bullying cases that led to suicides. Danny E. Martindale/Getty Images hide caption

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Danny E. Martindale/Getty Images

Raising Social Media Teens Means Constant Parental Learning

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Cell towers are constantly tracking the location of mobile phones. And that data, federal courts have ruled, is not constitutionally protected. Steve Greer/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Steve Greer/iStockphoto.com

Who Has The Right To Know Where Your Phone Has Been?

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