Daphne Beal (right) and her sister Cecily, who is developmentally disabled and legally blind. Daphne says that when they're together, they revert to the things they've done since they were kids. Courtesy of Daphne Beal hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Daphne Beal

Iraq vet Chris Rader takes an advanced vision test designed to spot hemianopsias and other vision problems. Rader’s hemianopsia prevents him from seeing any of the lights on the left side of the panel. Amy Standen/KQED hide caption

itoggle caption Amy Standen/KQED

Olivia's mom, Tamara, reads to her in the family's living room in Lincoln, Ill. Her father John and brother Brian are on the couch. Olivia Welter is 20 years old, now. She breathes with the help of the portable ventilator on the back of her wheelchair. She can't speak. She can't move. She can't even close her eyelids--her eyes are wide open. John Poole/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption John Poole/NPR

Katie Beckett fits herself with a vibrating vest that helps clear mucous from her lungs. A nurse comes over to her apartment in Cedar Rapids to help her do this twice a day. On the wall to the right are pictures of Katie as a child with Ronald Reagan. This story starts twenty-nine years ago with an angry President Ronald Reagan. <> We just recently received word of a little girl who has spent most of her life in a hospital. <> The little girl in the hospital was three-year-old Katie Beckett. Because of a brain infection, she needed to be hooked to a ventilator at night to breathe. Her parents wanted her home. Her doctors said she'd be better off at home. And it'd be cheaper, too: Just one-sixth the cost. John Poole/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption John Poole/NPR

Liz Etmanski (from left) and PLAN co-founders Al Etmanski and Vickie Cammack take a stroll on a beach in Vancouver, British Columbia. Courtesy of the Etmanski and Cammack family hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of the Etmanski and Cammack family