Tiphany Adams, Chelsie Hill, Angela Rockwood, Auti Angel and Mia Schaikewitz make up the cast of Push Girls. Greg Zook/ hide caption

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'Push Girls' Wheel Chairs Through Life And Love

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Paralyzed Rats Walk, Even Sprint After Rehab

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As Prosthetics Improve, Amputees Face New Choices

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Katie Beckett fits herself with a vibrating vest that helps clear mucous from her lungs. A nurse comes over to her apartment in Cedar Rapids to help her do this twice a day. On the wall to the right are pictures of Katie as a child with Ronald Reagan. This story starts twenty-nine years ago with an angry President Ronald Reagan. <> We just recently received word of a little girl who has spent most of her life in a hospital. <> The little girl in the hospital was three-year-old Katie Beckett. Because of a brain infection, she needed to be hooked to a ventilator at night to breathe. Her parents wanted her home. Her doctors said she'd be better off at home. And it'd be cheaper, too: Just one-sixth the cost. John Poole/NPR hide caption

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Brain Implant Lets Quadriplegics Move Robotic Limbs

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Staying fit and eating well can help cancer survivors, too, a review of the latest evidence shows. Lucy Pemoni/AP hide caption

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A schoolboy with a cochlear implant listens to his teacher during lessons at a school for the hearing impaired in Germany. The implants have dramatically changed the way deaf children learn and transition out of schools for the deaf and into classrooms with non-disabled students. Eckehard Schulz/AP hide caption

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Cochlear Implants Redefine What It Means To Be Deaf

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Ben Petrick dives into the plate during a 2001 game against the San Diego Padres at Coors Field in Denver, Colo. Brian Bahr/Getty Images hide caption

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Parkinson's Benches Petrick, But He's Still Not Out

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The National Federation of the Blind estimates that today only one in 10 blind people can read Braille. That's down dramatically from the 1900s. Steve Mitchell/AP hide caption

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Braille Under Siege As Blind Turn To Smartphones

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Synthetic Windpipe Transplant Boost For Tissue Engineering

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Learning To Love, And Be Loved, With Autism

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