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A Small Town Struggles With A Boom In Sober Living Homes

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Scientists with the international scientific collaboration known as the "Walk Again Project" use noninvasive brain-machine interfaces in their efforts to reawaken damaged fibers in the spinal cord. AASDAP and Lente Viva Filmes, São Paulo, Brazil/Nature hide caption

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Teresa, 31, worked at a pork processing plant in Nebraska for five years until injuries to her shoulder forced her to quit. She still has pain and can only work part-time. Brian Seifferlein/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Working 'The Chain,' Slaughterhouse Workers Face Lifelong Injuries

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Josephine Rudolph, 99, says she couldn't afford to live at the Joyce Eisenberg Keefer Medical Center Skilled Nursing Facility in Reseda, Calif., without Medi-Cal assistance. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Born This Way is produced by Jonathan Murray, the co-creator of MTV's Real World. Above, cast members Cristina Sanz (left), Rachel Osterbach, Steven Clark and Sean McElwee (top). Adam Taylor/A&E hide caption

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A Cast With Down Syndrome Brings Fresh Reality To Reality TV

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The physical therapy workouts a rehabilitation facility offers can be a crucial part of healing, doctors say. But a government study finds preventable harm — including bedsores and medication errors — occurring in some of those facilities, too. Andersen Ross/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Jason Olsen, a 39-year-old policy adviser for the Department of Labor, uses the Washington, D.C., Metro to commute to work three times a week. On the other days of the week, Olsen telecommutes from home to avoid the challenge of taking the Metro. Ruby Wallau/NPR hide caption

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Workplaces Can Be Particularly Stressful For Disabled Americans, Poll Finds

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A Nuremberg magnifier and wooden case, made in Germany around 1700. Before spectacles become easier to wear and more comfortable, hand-held models were more common than those for the face. Courtesy of the American Academy of Ophthalmology Museum of Vision hide caption

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William Kitt has lived in a studio apartment in New York owned by the nonprofit Broadway Housing Communities for 13 years, after decades of living on the streets. Bryan Thomas for NPR hide caption

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Invisibilia: For An Artist, A Room Of His Own Is A Lifesaver

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Jess Thom (left) and Jess Mabel Jones from Thom's show, Backstage in Biscuit Land. Thom's website says she's "changing the world, one tic at a time." James Lyndsay/Courtesy of Supporting Wall hide caption

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Kelli Glenn holds a photo of her father while he was in the hospital. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Suddenly Paralyzed, 2 Men Struggle To Recover From Guillain-Barre

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Jaime Rangel helps Gustavo Ruiz, 12, align a tire on his bike, at a recent community event in southeast Fresno, Calif. As manager for Bici Projects, Rangel promotes cycling in the Latino community as a great way to get in shape. Farida Jhabvala Romero/KQED hide caption

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