Professional fighter Gina Mazany practices during a training session at Xtreme Couture Mixed Martial Arts in Las Vegas. She well remembers her first concussion — which came in her first fight. "I was throwing up that night, Mazany says. Bridget Bennett for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Bridget Bennett for NPR

Female Athletes Are Closing The Gender Gap When It Comes To Concussions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/538294331/538970970" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Two-year-old Robbie Klein has hemophilia, a medical condition that interferes with his blood's ability to clot normally. Without insurance, the daily medications he needs to stay healthy could cost hundreds of thousands of dollars or more each year. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

toggle caption
Jesse Costa/WBUR

In Massachusetts, Proposed Medicaid Cuts Put Kids' Health Care At Risk

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/537695506/537754622" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The HHS inspector general found that some 22,000 Medicare Part D beneficiaries seem to be doctor shopping for opioids — obtaining large amounts prescribed by four or more doctors and filled at four or more pharmacies. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Isaac Hempstead Wright plays Bran Stark in the HBO adaptation of George R. R. Martin's Game of Thrones books. Some disability activists are concerned that Bran will be magically cured of his paralysis in the show's new season. Helen Sloan/HBO hide caption

toggle caption
Helen Sloan/HBO

'Game Of Thrones' Finds Fans Among Disability Rights Activists, Too

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/536052787/536505407" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A provision in the bill proposed by the GOP Senate would permit Medicaid to pay for longer stints of inpatient psychiatric care. But other parts of the bill would strip $772 billion from Medicaid — the single-largest funder of care for people who have schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or another serious mental illness. B. Boissonnet/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
B. Boissonnet/Getty Images

The porches of the 1890s Allison Buildings, shown above in 1910, were later enclosed to provide more space for patient beds. National Archives and Records Administration/National Building Museum hide caption

toggle caption
National Archives and Records Administration/National Building Museum

'Architecture Of An Asylum' Tracks History Of U.S. Treatment Of Mental Illness

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/535608442/535732207" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Medicaid pays the costs for about 62 percent of seniors who are living in nursing homes, some of the priciest health care available. Tomas Rodriguez/Getty Images/Picture Press RM hide caption

toggle caption
Tomas Rodriguez/Getty Images/Picture Press RM

Pemiscot Memorial, the public hospital in one of Missouri's poorest counties, depends on Medicaid funding to survive, its CEO says. Bram Sable-Smith/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

toggle caption
Bram Sable-Smith/Side Effects Public Media

Republicans' Proposed Medicaid Cuts Would Hit Rural Patients Hard

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/533680909/533909796" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript