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HOW LEARNING HAPPENS
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Katerina Maylock teaches a college test preparation class at Holton Arms School in Bethesda, Md. The current version of the SAT college entrance exam is having its final run, when thousands of students nationwide will sit, squirm or stress through the nearly four-hour reading, writing and math test. A new revamped version debuts in March. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Higher Ed

A History Of The SAT In 4 Questions

The SAT has gone through big changes since 1926. The test reflects the nation's biases and times. Here's our subjective tour of the exam's history — in four questions.

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There are shortages of special education teachers all over Idaho. Some teachers though, like Amy Griffin, a Resource Room teacher at Liberty Elementary School in Boise, Idaho, plan to make a career of it. Lee Hale/NPR hide caption

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K-12

Solving The Special Ed Teacher Shortage: Quality, Not Quantity

A nonprofit in Idaho is training better-prepared teachers who'll be less likely to leave the classroom after a year or two.

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President Obama gives his State of the Union address in Washington on Tuesday. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Tia Tsosie Begay is a fourth-grade teacher at a small public school on the outskirts of Tucson, Ariz. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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