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New York University announced it will not require the criminal record of prospective students in the first round of the admissions process. Jpellgen/Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption Jpellgen/Flickr

Families peruse the belongings left behind by DePauw students. Stan Jastrzebski hide caption

itoggle caption Stan Jastrzebski

Students walk through a gate on the Harvard University campus. In a recent complaint, dozens of groups have alleged that the school's admissions process holds Asian-American applicants to an unfairly high standard. Elise Amendola/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Elise Amendola/AP

Harvard campus. H. C./Flickr hide caption

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Caroline Solomon is a professor of biology at Gallaudet University, the renowned school for deaf and hard-of-hearing students. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Professors are now particularly attuned to the issue of "impostor syndrome" — a feeling students can have that they must have gotten into MIT by mistake. Robin Lubbock/WBUR hide caption

itoggle caption Robin Lubbock/WBUR

The Sweet Briar College campus in western Virginia. Aaron Mahler/Sweet Briar College hide caption

itoggle caption Aaron Mahler/Sweet Briar College

Makenzie Vasquez (from left), Pamala Hunt, Latonya Suggs, Ann Bowers, Nathan Hornes, Ashlee Schmidt, Natasha Hornes, Tasha Courtright, Michael Adorno and Sarah Dieffenbacher are refusing to pay back loans they took out to attend Corinthian Colleges. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Kristen Hannah Perez, a low-income, high-achieving student from Celina, Texas, plans to attend Dartmouth€ College next fall. Shereen Meraji/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Shereen Meraji/NPR