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HOW LEARNING HAPPENS

Students wait outside Everest College in Industry, Calif., hoping to get their transcriptions and information on loan forgiveness and transferring credits to other schools. In April, the school was one of the last Corinthian Colleges campuses to close. Christine Armario/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Christine Armario/AP

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"Instead of focusing on courses and credits students need to take, we're going to focus on the skills and knowledge they need to have to enter the classroom," says Arthur Levine, the president of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation. Cargo/ImageZoo/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Cargo/ImageZoo/Corbis

New York University announced it will not require the criminal record of prospective students in the first round of the admissions process. Jpellgen/Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption Jpellgen/Flickr

Families peruse the belongings left behind by DePauw students. Stan Jastrzebski hide caption

itoggle caption Stan Jastrzebski

Students walk through a gate on the Harvard University campus. In a recent complaint, dozens of groups have alleged that the school's admissions process holds Asian-American applicants to an unfairly high standard. Elise Amendola/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Elise Amendola/AP

Harvard campus. H. C./Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption H. C./Flickr

Caroline Solomon is a professor of biology at Gallaudet University, the renowned school for deaf and hard-of-hearing students. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Professors are now particularly attuned to the issue of "impostor syndrome" — a feeling students can have that they must have gotten into MIT by mistake. Robin Lubbock/WBUR hide caption

itoggle caption Robin Lubbock/WBUR

The Sweet Briar College campus in western Virginia. Aaron Mahler/Sweet Briar College hide caption

itoggle caption Aaron Mahler/Sweet Briar College