Bjorn Mustard of Chesapeake, Va., (left) says he felt depressed and uncomfortable before coming out as transgender. Brian Hopkins of Mathews County, Va., (right) says he believes transgender teens are confused and he supports rolling back protections for transgender students. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Gavin Grimm speaks during an interview at his home in Gloucester, Va., in 2015. Grimm sued his school district for the right to use the boys' bathroom; the case is scheduled to be argued before the Supreme Court next month. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

The Trump administration has reversed federal guidance that directed public schools to allow students to use the restrooms and locker rooms that corresponded to their gender identities. Sara D. Davis/Getty Images hide caption

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Sara D. Davis/Getty Images

Mae Jemison addresses congressional representatives and distinguished guests at Bayer's Making Science Make Sense 20th anniversary celebration in 2015. Kevin Wolf/AP Images for Bayer Making Science Make Sense hide caption

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Kevin Wolf/AP Images for Bayer Making Science Make Sense

After Making History In Space, Mae Jemison Works To Prime Future Scientists

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Terrence Johnson, a junior at the University of Mississippi, poses for a portrait outside his apartment in Oxford, Miss. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

A Student's Perspective On Mississippi: Beautiful, Engulfing And Sometimes Enraging

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A happy hour event put on by the Adulting School, where participants learn how to make craft cocktails, at Maine Craft Distilling in Portland, Maine. Other skills taught by the school include changing a flat tire, making deviled eggs and folding sheets. Courtesy of Rachel Weinstein hide caption

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Courtesy of Rachel Weinstein

Adulting School Teaches Young Adults Grown-Up Skills

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Denver Looks For Balanced Approach To School Choice

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Students' hands gather in a circle in Tanya Streicher's class at Gilpin Montessori School in Denver. Courtesy of Tanya Streicher hide caption

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Courtesy of Tanya Streicher

Part Two: Portfolio Strategy

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Zachary Linderer said he wanted to go to college to major in the field of science, but growing up as a Jehovah's Witness, higher education was prohibited by his parents. Courtesy Luke Vander Ploeg hide caption

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Courtesy Luke Vander Ploeg

Lack Of Education Leads To Lost Dreams And Low Income For Many Jehovah's Witnesses

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Spring Lake Park High School junior Kia Muleta has been playing the clarinet since fifth grade. Kia wants more diversity in her band music. She is often the only black student in band, where most of the music was composed by white men. Evan Frost/MPR News hide caption

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Why This High School Band Is Only Buying Music From Composers Of Color This Year

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Protesters gather outside Jefferson Middle School in Washington, where Education Secretary Betsy DeVos paid her first visit as education secretary. Maria Danilova/AP hide caption

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Maria Danilova/AP

Martin Shkreli, seen here leaving court in New York City last June, faced protests and a false fire alarm during an event Wednesday at Harvard. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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LA Johnson/NPR

These Top Schools Are Offering Big Savings On Master's Degrees, But There's A Catch

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