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President Trump poses with Liberty University President Jerry Falwell Jr., during commencement at Liberty University May 13 in Lynchburg, Va. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Some Liberty University Grads Are Returning Their Diplomas To Protest Trump

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According to a new study, among families in the middle socioeconomic group the older, September-born kids were 2.6 percent more likely to attend college and 2.6 percent more likely to graduate from an elite university. Rawpixel Ltd./Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Rawpixel Ltd./Getty Images/iStockphoto

An MS-13 gang member at a prison in Salvador. As the gang spread from Central America to the U.S., authorities say its symbols became more subtle. Luis Romero/AP hide caption

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Luis Romero/AP

Sports Jersey Or Gang Symbol? Why Spotting MS-13 Recruits Is Tougher Than It Seems

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Kyle Quinn, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering at the University of Arkansas, was wrongly identified on social media as a participant in a white supremacist march in Charlottesville, Va. Jennifer Mortensen hide caption

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Jennifer Mortensen

Kyle Quinn Hid At A Friend's House After Being Misidentified On Twitter As A Racist

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How Do Teachers Talk About Hate Speech?

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Protesters hold signs and chant at a rally for DACA in Washington, D.C. LA Johnson/NPR hide caption

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LA Johnson/NPR

Five Years In, What's Next For DACA?

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In December, a Texas A&M student signs a message board ahead of an "Aggies United" event in response to a speech by white separatist Richard Spencer. Spencer was scheduled to return to the school for a "White Lives Matter" rally on Sept. 11. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP