Education NPR news and commentary on education, schools, colleges and universities, and emerging trends in learning. Listen to audio and subscribe to RSS feeds.

Copies of How To Build Wealth, a series of nine audio business courses created by Trump University, were on display at a Barnes & Noble store in New York City in 2005. Scott Gries/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Scott Gries/Getty Images
Adam Cole/NPR

A New Kind Of March Madness Hits Schools

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/521148505/521884369" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Students at Howard University in Washington, D.C. The historically black university is opening Howard West at Google's headquarters in Mountain View. Howard University hide caption

toggle caption
Howard University

Google Hopes To Hire More Black Engineers By Bringing Students To Silicon Valley

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/521737097/521737124" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Inmates from the Eastern Correctional Facility listen as professor Delia Mellis leads a class on the Cold War. More than 300 students are enrolled in the Bard Prison Initiative each semester, within a curriculum that offers over 60 courses. Cameron Robert/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Cameron Robert/NPR

College Classes In Maximum Security: 'It Gives You Meaning'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/518135204/521693460" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Cargo/Getty Images/Imagezoo

How For-Profit Colleges Sell 'Risky Education' To The Most Vulnerable

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/521371034/521677347" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tomiko Ball's classroom at Orr Elementary School in southeast Washington, D.C. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Elissa Nadworny/NPR

'Open Schools' Made Noise In The '70s; Now They're Just Noisy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/520953343/521693478" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Concerns After Texas School Opens 'Prayer Room' That's Attracting Muslim Students

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/521567078/521567079" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Howard University Aims To Build Silicon Valley Pipeline Of Black Software Engineers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/521517159/521517160" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Atole de elote is a warm corn drink from Central America. Student Jose Rivas wrote an essay about a weekly tradition of enjoying atole with his late father in El Salvador, and how the drink helped him to feel more at home after he moved to the U.S. Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Becky Harlan/NPR
LA Johnson/NPR

A High School's Lesson For Helping English Language Learners Get To College

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/520848889/521474739" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A new study shows that when infants and young children grow up in households without enough to eat, they are more likely to perform poorly at school years later. Daniel Fishel for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Daniel Fishel for NPR