Firefighters battle part of the Sand Fire after flames jumped across a road in Santa Clarita, Calif., on Sunday. As the blaze changed direction multiple times over the weekend firefighters were forced to retreat and thousands of people have been evacuated from their homes. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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A car drives by a Switch data center in Las Vegas on Sept. 9, 2015. In 2013, data centers consumed 2 percent of all U.S. power — triple what they used in 2000. John Locher/AP hide caption

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Making The Cloud Green: Tech Firms Push For Renewable Energy Sources

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Agustin Mayta Condori shows a sick alpaca, which he predicted would die the next day because of subfreezing temperatures in the southern Andes in Peru. Thousands of alpacas have died in the region. Rodrigo Abd/AP hide caption

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Grains, beads and bangles unearthed from dig sites in Banda, Ghana, tell of a time when droughts did not bring famine. (Above) Archaeologists Amanda Logan and Osei Kofi dig into the floor of a house from the 1500s. Courtesy of Ann Stahl/Northwestern University hide caption

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Starting this week, Wal-Mart, America's largest grocer, says it will start piloting sales of weather-dented apples at a discount in 300 of its Florida stores. Courtesy of Wal-Mart hide caption

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NASA Scientists Predict Another All-Time Heat Record For 2016

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Volkswagen used six different "defeat devices" to purposefully skirt U.S. emissions rules, new lawsuits say. Here, VW cars are seen in a delivery tower in Wolfsburg, Germany, earlier this year. Markus Schreiber/AP hide caption

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Marine ecologist Neil Hammerschlag says he can sometimes identify sharks like Emma (pictured) by the way they move. "It's pretty cool to be able to jump in the water and say, 'Hey look, there's Emma the tiger shark!' " Neil Hammerschlag hide caption

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A Marine Ecologist On Swimming With Sharks And What 'Jaws' Got Wrong

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Not In My Landfill: Georgia Residents Fight Plan To Store Toxic Coal Ash

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Logger Greg Hemmerich and his crew feed low-value trees into a wood chipper, before bringing the chips to ReEnergy Holdings' biomass plant in Lyonsdale, N.Y. David Sommerstein/NCPR hide caption

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Is Burning Trees Still Green? Some Experts Now Question Biomass

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About 70 percent of Earth is covered by clouds at any given moment. Their interaction with climate isn't easy to study, scientists say; these shape-shifters move quickly. NOAA/Flickr hide caption

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Climate Change May Already Be Shifting Clouds Toward The Poles

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The blue-green algae is called cyanobacteria. It can release toxins that affect the liver and nervous system. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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'A Government-Sponsored Disaster': Florida Asks For Federal Help With Toxic Algae

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