Environment Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

Saving The Amazon Will Take More Than Stopping Loggers

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Farms outside Baghdad as seen from a U.S. Army Blackhawk helicopter. Much of Iraq's soil has a high salt content because of flooding and poor drainage. Jim Gordon/U.S. Army Corps of Engineers/Flickr hide caption

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Jim Gordon/U.S. Army Corps of Engineers/Flickr

These scuba divers are among the 2 million tourists who visit the Great Barrier Reef each year. They contribute about $5.6 billion to Australia's economy, according to the Queensland government. Steve Dorsey for NPR hide caption

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Steve Dorsey for NPR

As Great Barrier Reef Ails, Australia Scrambles To Save It

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The San Luis Reservoir in central California is the largest "off-channel" reservoir in the U.S. It is currently at less than 30 percent of its normal capacity. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

Coping In A Drier World: California's Drought Survival Strategy

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Why Are The Great Lakes On The Rise?

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The restoration's goal is to put as much of the Kissimmee as possible back to the way it was. This photo shows the river after restoration. Courtesy the South Florida Water Management District hide caption

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Courtesy the South Florida Water Management District

The Kissimmee: A River Re-Curved

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Researchers say there's plenty the beef industry can do to use less land and water and emit fewer greenhouse gas emissions. But producers may need to charge a premium to make those changes. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Corn farmer Jerry McCulley sprays the weedkiller glyphosate across his cornfield in Auburn, Ill., in 2010. An increasing number of weeds have now evolved resistance to the chemical. Seth Perlman/AP hide caption

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Seth Perlman/AP

Santa Cruz Enforces California's Toughest Drought Restrictions

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How Too Many Trees Contribute To California's Drought

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The Tricky Nature Of Putting Science On Trial

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