Half A Century Later, A Return To Challenger Deep

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An oyster shucker on Samish Island, Wash. on Puget Sound. The state is frequently forced to close beaches to oyster gatherers because of the risks of harmful algae blooms. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Battling 'Red Tide,' Scientists Map Toxic Algae To Prevent Shellfish Poisoning

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Researchers have analyzed the fossil imprints of of raindrops, like the ones shown here, to study the atmosphere of the Earth, as it was 2.7 billion years ago. The rule at the top is 5 centimeters, or about 2 inches, long. W. Alterman/University of Pretoria hide caption

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Raindrops In Rock: Clues To A Perplexing Paradox

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EPA Plan Targets New Coal-Fired Plants

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Exxon Valdez Heads To Scrap Heap

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Cherry Blossoms As Botanical Diplomacy

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Pinon pine trees like this one dominate Rattlesnake Canyon. Jeff Mitton hide caption

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Pipe Down! That Noise Might Affect Your Plants

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Archaeologists Revisit Iraq

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Making the Shift To Electric Vehicles

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Mike and Chantell Sackett of Priest Lake, Idaho, pose for a photo in front of the Supreme Court in Washington on Oct. 14, 2011. The court ruled unanimously Wednesday that property owners have a right to prompt review by a judge of an important tool used by the Environmental Protection Agency to address water pollution. Haraz N. Ghanbari/AP hide caption

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A drilling rig sits on Oooguruk Island off the coast of Alaska's North Slope. The 6-acre island was built by Pioneer Natural Resources so it could drill for oil on the Arctic Ocean. Steve Quinn/AP hide caption

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Native Alaskans Divided On State's Oil Drilling Debate

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A bald eagle in flight. The Northern Arapaho Tribe in Wyoming has won an unprecedented permit to hunt two bald eagles for use in religious ceremonies. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Wyoming Tribe Wins Right To Hunt Two Bald Eagles

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JBI CEO John Bordynuik holds a jar of No. 6 fuel oil, derived from discarded plastic like that seen on a conveyor belt at his plant. Daniel Robison/WNED hide caption

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Startup Converts Plastic To Oil, And Finds A Niche

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