Doctors at a hospital in Aleppo, Syria, treat a boy injured in what the government said was a chemical weapons attack on March 19. Syria's government and rebels accused each other of firing a rocket loaded with chemical agents outside of Aleppo. George Ourfalian/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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How Doctors Would Know If Syrians Were Hit With Nerve Gas

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The research of British naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913) played a pivotal role in developing the theory of natural selection. But over time, Charles Darwin became almost universally thought of as the father of evolution. Hulton-Deutsch Collection/Corbis hide caption

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He Helped Discover Evolution, And Then Became Extinct

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Beekeepers demonstrate at the EU headquarters in Brussels Monday, as lawmakers vote on whether to ban pesticides blamed for killing bees. Georges Gobet/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Great Salt Lake Is No 'Dead Sea'

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Eduardo Somarriba is a researcher at the Center for Tropical Agricultural Research and Education in Turrialba, Costa Rica. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Exploring Coffee's Past To Rescue Its Future

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Illinois River Crests To All-Time High Near Peoria

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Researchers are using small remote-controlled planes to survey the populations of the greater sage grouse. Stephen J. Krasemann/Science Source hide caption

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From Battle To Birds: Drones Get Second Life Counting Critters

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An oil sheen appears along the shore of the Kalamazoo River in August 2012. In July 2010, more than 800,000 gallons of tar sands oil entered Talmadge Creek and flowed into the Kalamazoo River, a Lake Michigan tributary. Heavy rains caused the river to overtop existing dams and carried oil 30 miles downstream. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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EPA: Tar Sands Pipelines Should Be Held To Different Standards

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By this time last year, 26 percent of the country's corn crop was already planted. A wet, cold spring means that only 4 percent is in the ground right now. Seth Perlman/AP hide caption

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For Corn, Fickle Weather Makes For Uncertain Yields

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Luis Fernando Vasquez has been a coffee farmer in the central valley of Costa Rica his entire life. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Coffee For A Cause: What Do Those Feel-Good Labels Deliver?

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43 Years Of Earth Day: What's Changed Since 1970

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Photovoltaic cells on the office building's roof. Courtesy of John Stamets hide caption

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This Building Is Supergreen. Will It Be Copied?

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A dispute over Texas' access to the Kiamichi River, which is located in Oklahoma, has started a longer legal battle that is headed to the Supreme Court. Joe Wertz for NPR hide caption

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Thirsty States Take Water Battle To Supreme Court

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