Whether the error in Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia's recent dissent was originally his fault or a clerk's doesn't make it less cringeworthy. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Alex Wong/Getty Images

Wild bees, such as this Andrena bee visiting highbush blueberry flowers, play a key role in boosting crop yields. Left photo by Rufus Isaac/AAAS; Right photo courtesy of Daniel M.N. Turner hide caption

toggle caption Left photo by Rufus Isaac/AAAS; Right photo courtesy of Daniel M.N. Turner

Concerns Raised Over Exporting Liquefied Natural Gas

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/308220391/308220392" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Farmers And Frackers Wrangle For Water In Shadow Of Calif. Drought

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/308068203/308068204" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

High Court Ruling Revives Law Against Out-Of-State Pollution

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/308068210/308068211" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kansas Town Destroyed By Tornado Spreads Blame For Lack Of Growth

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/307913565/307913566" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Between Farmers And Frackers, Calif. Water Caught In Tussle

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/307766319/307766320" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A line of fire turns brown grass into black earth. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Dan Charles/NPR

Fire-Setting Ranchers Have Burning Desire To Save Tallgrass Prairie

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/306227655/307627445" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A worker drives an electric cart past air monitoring equipment inside a storage room of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in Carlsbad, N.M., shown in this undated photo. Anonymous/AP hide caption

toggle caption Anonymous/AP

Volunteer Tom Strain carries debris from an empty lot as part of an Earth Day cleanup effort in Camden, N.J. The Earth Day events celebrated on April 22 promote a sustainable and clean environment. Mel Evans/AP hide caption

toggle caption Mel Evans/AP

Recent rains kept Suzanne and Mike Collins' orange grove alive, but the rainy season is ending. If they don't get federal irrigation water by this summer, their trees will start dying. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Kirk Siegler/NPR

Fields And Farm Jobs Dry Up With California's Worsening Drought

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/303726931/305814429" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Forced To Put Its Nets Away, One Fla. Town Clams Up — Literally

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/305671199/305671200" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Cannon Michael's farm grows tomatoes, melons and onions, among other crops. This year, however, Michael will have to fallow one-fifth of the land due to the drought Thomas Dreisbach/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Thomas Dreisbach/NPR

California's Drought Ripples Through Businesses, Then To Schools

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/304173037/305339577" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript