A typical Native American oyster deposit, or midden, dating to about 1,000 years ago. Archaeologists are finding clues to sustainable oysters harvesting in these remains. Torben Rick/Smithsonian Institution hide caption

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You Think It's Hot Where You Are?

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Light shines on the mountains behind the Mendenhall Glacier in Juneau, Alaska. Guides are using the glacier's rapid retreat as a stark lesson on the effects of climate change. Becky Bohrer/AP hide caption

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Visitors To A Shrinking Alaskan Glacier Get A Lesson On Climate Change

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Michael Peterson, an archaeologist at Redwood National Park in California, photographs the coastline annually to monitor erosion of archaeological sites. Jes Burns/OPB/EarthFix hide caption

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As Storms Erode California's Cliffs, Buried Village Could Get Washed Away

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In 2016, Mesa Verde National Park officials closed Spruce Tree House because of crumbling rock. Previous restoration efforts and more extreme temperature swings, which may be connected to climate change, are two reasons why the staff here thinks rock is crumbling. Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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To Preserve History, A National Park Preps For Climate Change

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Crews work to clean up an oil spill on the North Saskatchewan River on Friday. Husky Energy has said between 200,000 and 250,000 liters of crude oil and other material leaked into the river on Thursday from its pipeline. Jason Franson/The Canadian Press via AP hide caption

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Firefighters battle part of the Sand Fire after flames jumped across a road in Santa Clarita, Calif., on Sunday. As the blaze changed direction multiple times over the weekend firefighters were forced to retreat and thousands of people have been evacuated from their homes. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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A car drives by a Switch data center in Las Vegas on Sept. 9, 2015. In 2013, data centers consumed 2 percent of all U.S. power — triple what they used in 2000. John Locher/AP hide caption

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Making The Cloud Green: Tech Firms Push For Renewable Energy Sources

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Agustin Mayta Condori shows a sick alpaca, which he predicted would die the next day because of subfreezing temperatures in the southern Andes in Peru. Thousands of alpacas have died in the region. Rodrigo Abd/AP hide caption

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Grains, beads and bangles unearthed from dig sites in Banda, Ghana, tell of a time when droughts did not bring famine. (Above) Archaeologists Amanda Logan and Osei Kofi dig into the floor of a house from the 1500s. Courtesy of Ann Stahl/Northwestern University hide caption

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