Smelly Invaders Want To Crawl Into Your Home

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Gulf Oil Spill Claims Process Streamlined

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Forest Near Mount Rushmore Suffers Beetle Attack

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A Portion Of BP's Fines Will Go To Gulf Restoration

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Inside Veolia Energy's Plant Three in Baltimore, blue pipes carry chilled water that will be sent out to cool nearby buildings. The green pipes carry condensed water that removes heat from the chilling system, and orange pipes carry a refrigerant. The yellow pipes are for a future cooling system. Mike Ruocco/NPR hide caption

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Chilled-Out Buildings Save Energy, Money

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Odd Todd

Listen To Us Weigh A Hurricane

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Retired Coast Guard Adm. Thad Allen testifies Monday before the commission investigating the Gulf of Mexico oil spill. Though Allen was the government's leader of the spill response, he acknowledged it was not always clear to the public who was in charge. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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At Oil Spill Hearing, Calls For New Response Plan

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Bayou Bienvenue in New Orleans is an example of south Louisiana’s wetland loss. Fifty years ago, this was a productive freshwater marsh with cypress and tupelo trees. Today, stumps are all that remain, as saltwater has encroached inland. Debbie Elliot/NPR hide caption

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La. Looks To New Plan To Restore Fragile Coast

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A slice of Hurricane Karl was captured by NASA's CloudSat satellite. The clouds were just over 8 miles high. hide caption

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Studying Storms: NASA Looks For Hurricane's Secrets

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Study: Wind May Have Helped Moses Part Red Sea

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Wildlife biologist Anthony Fischbach observes a tagged walrus near Point Lay, Alaska, earlier this month. Tens of thousands of walruses have come ashore in northwest Alaska because the sea ice they normally rest on has melted. U.S. Geological Survey/AP hide caption

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Biologist Tracks Walruses Forced Ashore As Ice Melts

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A male Florida panther walks down Jane's Scenic Drive in Fakahatchee Strand Preserve State Park. Before scientists bred the Florida panthers with cats from Texas, they lacked vitality and were near extinction. Science/AAAS hide caption

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Bounding, Rebounding: Panthers Make A Comeback

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John Wright: The Man Who Killed The BP Gulf Spill

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