Greek flags fly beside those of the European Union in Athens. Many people chalk the phrase up to Shakespeare, but its origins likely date back much earlier than that --€” to medieval monks eager for a cop-out. Matt Cardy/Getty Images hide caption

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The Soyuz-U space launch vehicle rocket carrying the Russian cargo ship Progress M-28M launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome on Friday. The Progress resupply capsule successfully docked with the International Space Station on Sunday. Sergai Savostyanov/ITAR-TASS/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Sergai Savostyanov/ITAR-TASS/Landov

German Finance Minister Wolfang Schaeuble frowns on a pro-no poster opposite graffiti that reads "no" in German — but also sounds like "yes" in Greek. The photo was taken in Athens on Sunday. Kay Nietfeld/DPA/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Kay Nietfeld/DPA/Landov

During the Revolutionary War, many loyalists were treated brutally --€” like the tarred and feathered man in this print. When the war wrapped up, loyalists often found they had to fend for themselves, or flee. David Claypoole Johnston/Library of Congress hide caption

itoggle caption David Claypoole Johnston/Library of Congress

Pensioners queue outside a national bank branch in Athens on Thursday. Greek banks are running out of cash and the situation poses further danger to the economy, analysts say. Aris Messinis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Aris Messinis/AFP/Getty Images

A man waits at an Athens bus stop where the Greek word "no" has been spray-painted over "yes" on a banner put up in advance of Sunday's referendum. Greek voters will say whether they want to accept or reject a deal that's been offered by the country's creditors. Greeks are deeply divided and analysts say the outcome is not clear. Thanassis Stavrakis/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Thanassis Stavrakis/AP