An Iraqi man walks past paintings displayed at a gallery in the Karrada district of central Baghdad on April 13, 2010. Sabah Arar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Many Iraqi Artists Struggle, Suffer In Silence

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Cherry trees bloom in Washington, D.C.'s tidal basin, with the Jefferson monument in the background. Japan gave 3,000 trees as a gift to the U.S. in 1912. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Japan's Cherry Blossoms In Brief, Beautiful Bloom

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A soldier stands guard next to Tutankhamen's gold mask inside the Egyptian Museum on Feb. 16. Looters broke into the museum in Cairo's Tahrir Square in late January. Pedro Ugarte/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Egypt's Antiquities Still At Risk, Experts Warn

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By the time Gauguin arrived in the late 1800s, Tahiti had been "thoroughly Christianized and colonized" by the French, says National Gallery curator Mary Morton. Women didn't walk around half-nude — but Gauguin painted them that way anyway. Above, an 1899 depiction of Two Tahitian Women. The Metropolitan Museum of Art hide caption

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Gauguin's Nude Tahitians Give The Wrong Impression

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A woman dressed in rags is the subject of Tattered and Torn by Alfred Kappes. Oil on canvas, 1886. Smith College Museum of Art, Northampton, Mass hide caption

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Portraits Of The Poor: Dignity In Times Of Despair

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For 40 years, the Rothko Chapel in Houston has served as a space for personal contemplation, interfaith dialogue and action for human rights. The sanctuary was created by Mark Rothko, who committed suicide one year before the chapel opened. Hickey Robertson/The Rothko Chapel hide caption

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Meditation And Modern Art Meet In Rothko Chapel

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Diana and Actaeon (1556-59): Italian painter Titian depicts Actaeon, a mortal hunter, who accidentally encounters Diana, goddess of the hunt, as she bathes. Click "Enlarge" to see the full painting. Minneapolis Institute of Arts hide caption

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The Surprising Tale Of Two Sexy, Titian Masterpieces

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Picasso Painting Sells For $40.7 Million At Auction

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When the National Portrait Gallery removed a work after pressure from activists and politicians, a project called the Museum of Censored Art set up shop right outside the museum's doors. Erin Schwartz/NPR hide caption

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As 'Hide/Seek' Ends, A Step Back To Look For Lessons

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The Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh has put up Pierre Auguste Renoir's Bathers with Crab (c. 1890-1899) on a Steelers victory in Super Bowl XLV. Courtesy Carnegie Museum of Art hide caption

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Pittsburgh Bets A Renoir On Super Bowl Victory

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Diana and Callisto, 1556-59 Minneapolis Institute of Arts hide caption

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Two Titian Masterpieces Traveling Through U.S.

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Painting Of Picasso's Mistress To Be Auctioned

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