Fine Art Fine Art

Kumu (sp. Parupeneus porphyreus). The Whitesaddle Goatfish has a special place in Hawaiian culture. In ancient Hawaii, the fish were used in offerings to the gods. Courtesy of Derek Yoshinori Wada hide caption

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Courtesy of Derek Yoshinori Wada
Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner's address book, circa 1950-1956 Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner's address book, circa 1950-1956 Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution

Peek Inside The 'Little Black Books' Of Some Famous American Artists

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Paul Durand-Ruel, shown above in his gallery in 1910, acquired some 5,000 impressionist works — long before others were buying them. Dornac/Durand-Ruel & Cie/Courtesy of Philadelphia Museum of Art hide caption

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Dornac/Durand-Ruel & Cie/Courtesy of Philadelphia Museum of Art

Durand-Ruel: The Art Dealer Who Liked Impressionists Before They Were Cool

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Rontherin Ratliff's Things that Float sculpture contains photographs he rescued from his grandmother's drowned house. Courtesy of Rontherin Ratliff hide caption

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Courtesy of Rontherin Ratliff

After Katrina, New Artists Found Inspiration In A Recovering City

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Vermeer's Girl with a Pearl Earring stares back at cellphones at the Frick Collection in New York City. "The art museum used to offer objects, works of art, the finest that we have," Lewis says. "And it's gone from offering objects to offering an experience." Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images

People Love Art Museums — But Has The Art Itself Become Irrelevant?

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Muslim Feminists Rewrite Boundaries On The Street And At Home

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Artist Yasuo Kuniyoshi, seen here in his New York studio in 1940, exhibited with Georgia O'Keeffe and Edward Hopper. But his work was quickly forgotten after his death in 1953. Alfredo Valente/Alfredo Valente papers/ Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution hide caption

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Alfredo Valente/Alfredo Valente papers/ Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution

The Anxious Art Of Japanese Painter (And 'Enemy Alien') Yasuo Kuniyoshi

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A photo of Pablo Picasso's painting, Head of a Young Woman, released by French authorities on Tuesday. The painting was seized from a yacht on July 31 in Corsica, France. The painting belongs to a Spanish billionaire who was planning to sell it elsewhere in Europe. But Spanish authorities say it is a "national treasure" that can't be sent abroad without government permission. Douane Francaise via AP hide caption

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Douane Francaise via AP

A Picasso, A Yacht And A Dollop Of International Intrigue

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The Ogden Museum of Southern Art's "The Rising" exhibition includes portraits (by photographer Jonathan Traviesa) of the day laborers who helped rebuild New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. Jonathan Traviesa/Courtesy of the Ogden Museum of Southern Art hide caption

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Jonathan Traviesa/Courtesy of the Ogden Museum of Southern Art

Forget The Wreckage: Museums' Katrina Shows Look At How City Has Moved On

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Video Shows Unauthorized Visitor One Night Before Museum Theft

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When the reservations were established and peace made between the Apsáalooke and the Lakota, there were frequent visits between the tribes. The result was that Lakota warbonnets, pipebags and even pipes were placed in Crow hands. Jenae Neeson/Courtesy of the Brinton Museum hide caption

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Jenae Neeson/Courtesy of the Brinton Museum

How A Candy Magnate Helped Bring A Holy Collection Home

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Sultan 'Ali 'Adil Shah II Slays a Tiger (ca. 1660) is part of the Metropolitan Museum of Art's critically acclaimed Sultans of Deccan India, 1500-1700 Opulence and Fantasy exhibition. The Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. Lent by Howard Hodgkin./Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art hide caption

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The Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. Lent by Howard Hodgkin./Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Opulent And Apolitical: The Art Of The Met's Islamic Galleries

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Fibers from the fique plant, dyed with natural pigments by artist Susana Mejia, are part of the Waterweavers exhibit. In the photo above, the fibers hang to dry in the Amazon jungle. Jorge Montoya hide caption

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Jorge Montoya

Chiharu Shiota takes over an entire townhouse for her 2013 work Trace of Memory. It's one of the many unusual installations at The Mattress Factory in Pittsburgh. Courtesy of The Mattress Factory hide caption

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Courtesy of The Mattress Factory

Find Unforgettable Art In A Most Unlikely Place: A Pittsburgh Mattress Factory

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