Tom Crane/Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts

Pop Art Master Oldenburg Unveils Another Big Idea

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By 1985, Warhol's style had evolved substantially; on this untitled headline piece, he collaborated with Keith Haring. National Gallery of Art hide caption

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National Gallery of Art

Andy Warhol's 'Headline': Sensationalism Always Sells

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The News, As Reported By Andy Warhol

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Marchers demonstrate against the German labor reforms, known as Hartz IV. (November 5, 2005) Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Germany's Painful Unemployment Fix

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In 1992, Lesage started an embroidery school to pass on to a new generation the techniques of an art form threatened by mass-produced fashion. Olivier Saillant/Maison Lesage hide caption

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Olivier Saillant/Maison Lesage

At Maison Lesage, Beauty Embroidered By Hand

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Man Ray Portrait of Lee Miller - Flying Head, c. 1930 Paris Vintage gelatin silver print Lee Miller Archives hide caption

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Lee Miller Archives

Much More Than A Muse: Lee Miller And Man Ray

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Aline Saarinen taking a photograph, circa 1955 Archives of American Art/Smithsonian Institution. hide caption

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Archives of American Art/Smithsonian Institution.

Little Pictures, Big Lives: Snapshots Of American Artists

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The right eye of Leonardo da Vinci's "Mona Lisa." On Aug. 21, 1911, the then-little-known painting was stolen from the wall of the Louvre in Paris. And a legend was born. Associated Press hide caption

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Associated Press

The Theft That Made The 'Mona Lisa' A Masterpiece

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'The Clock': Watching A 24-Hour Film

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The High Museum of Art commissioned nendo, a Japanese design collective, to create Visible Structures — a 12-piece installation of furniture made out of form core and cardboard, reinforced with graphite tape. Masayuki Hayashi hide caption

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Masayuki Hayashi

Form And Function Meet In 'Modern By Design'

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Samuel F. B. Morse, Gallery of the Louvre, 1831–1833, oil on canvas. Click here to enlarge. Richard House/Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection/Courtesy of the National Gallery of Art hide caption

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Richard House/Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection/Courtesy of the National Gallery of Art

The Best Of The Louvre, On A Single Canvas

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A visitor looks at paintings at the Barnes Foundation in Lower Merion, Pa. The art collection is moving to a new building in downtown Philadelphia. Jessica Griffin/AP hide caption

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Jessica Griffin/AP

Barnes Gallery Draws Art Lovers For One Last Look

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The Cone sisters typically forged strong patron-artist relationships, but they were particularly close with Henri Matisse. While working on Large Reclining Nude, Matisse sent 22 photographs of the work in progress to Etta Cone. The Baltimore Museum of Art hide caption

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The Baltimore Museum of Art

A Tale Of Two Sisters And Their Serious Eye For Art

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A self-portrait by Rembrandt, valued at $36 million, was taken from the Swedish National Museum in 2000. Robert Wittman, founder of the FBI's Art Crime Team, went undercover — as an authenticator for an Eastern European mob group — to recover it. Swedish National Museum hide caption

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Swedish National Museum

Robert Wittman's 'Priceless' Pursuit Of Stolen Art

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