Object (or Luncheon in Fur), by Meret Oppenheim. In 1936, Oppenheim wrapped a teacup, saucer and spoon in fur. In the age of Freud, a gastro-sexual interpretation was inescapable. Even today, the work triggers intense reactions. Flavia Brandi/Flickr hide caption

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Saudi artist Abdulnasser Gharem poses in front of "Generation Kill," a piece made with rubber stamps, digital print and paint, at the opening night of his exhibition titled Al Sahwa (The Awakening) at Ayyam gallery in Dubai in 2014. Aya Batrawy/AP hide caption

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Campbell Jeff McLane/LA Louver hide caption

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"Market Symphony" is a new audio installation at the National Museum of African Art in Washington, D.C. The exhibition layers sound from a market in Lagos, Nigeria. The speakers are installed on enamelware trays which are often used in markets. Courtesy of the National Museum of African Art hide caption

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Singer-songwriter Walter Martin. Sebastian Kim/Ile Flottante Music hide caption

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Ahead of a press conference with Premier Matteo Renzi and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, wooden panels were erected around some Roman statues in Rome's Capitoline Museums. Giuseppe Lami/AP hide caption

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The Knoedler & Company art gallery, shown here in 2010, had been in business since before the Civil War. The gallery permanently closed its doors in 2011. Paul Goguen/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Before it moved to the Museum of Fine Arts, Frida Kahlo's Dos Mujeres (Salvadora y Herminia) belonged to the family of American industrialist Jackson Cole Phillips, who purchased it from Kahlo in 1929. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston hide caption

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This platinum-engraved sapphire disk, part of a set illustrating Earth's biodiversity, will be housed in the Earth Chamber of the MoonArk. It's designed by Mark Baskinger with Matt Zywica, Maggie Banks, Christie Chong, Bettina Chou, Adella Guo, Natalie Harmon, Deborah Lee, Deniz Sokullu and Carolyn Zhou. Courtesy of The Moon Arts Project hide caption

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Ellsworth Kelly, shown before one of his huge pieces at Peter Carlson Enterprises, Sun Valley, in 1996, has died at the age of 92. Clarence Williams/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Over a decades-long career, Frank Stella has done sculptures, three-dimensional reliefs, brightly-colored geometric shapes and mostly black paintings that literally changed the way people looked at art. (Pictured here: Empress of India, 1965.) 2015 Frank Stella/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Digital Image/The Museum of Modern Art/Licensed by SCALA / Art Resource, NY. hide caption

toggle caption 2015 Frank Stella/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Digital Image/The Museum of Modern Art/Licensed by SCALA / Art Resource, NY.

Artist Rogan Brown's paper sculptures are many times larger than the organisms that inspire them. Magic Circle Variation 5 is approximately 39 inches wide by 39 inches tall in its entirety. Brown has created multiple versions of Magic Circle, the shape of which alludes to a petri dish and a microscope lens. Courtesy of Rogan Brown hide caption

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